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Sony tfm 1600W

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by PtrkLnk, Jan 20, 2012.

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  1. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    I found this radio and have been fixing it up because I think it it kind of unusual. It is a sony tfm 1600W
    [​IMG]

    I have it all together and working but there is one thing wrong with it. It should be able to run off of either batteries, or plug into the wall. It only works with the batteries, when I try to run it off of the wall current it does not turn on

    I have taken it apart again and it is divided up into nice sections. I found the circuit board that changes the voltage down to what it needs to be, and have removed it from the radio.

    the thing that worries me is there are several very big capacities on it, and I do not want to get killed or any thing. what I am looking for here is two things.

    First of all, is it safe to work on this thing or what should I do?
    Second thing is actually fixing it. I am good at soldering and De-soldering, I just need to know what to replace and were to get it.

    this website has a good schematic of both the assembly of the radio and the circuit boards. I just can not figure out how to view the whole thing.

    http://www.radiomuseum.org/r/sony_tfm1600tfm_160.html

    I can take a picture of the board I took out of it here this afternoon.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    Pictures would be good.

    From the look of this, the large capacitors will be low voltage (ou can confirm this by looking at the voltage rating) and will be mostly harmless.

    Check that the correct mains voltage has been selected and also any fuse that may be present.

    The fault is almost certainly with the power supply, althouhgh if there is a switch to select between batteries and mains power, that may be worth looking at too.

    Do you have a multimeter, and do you know how to use it?
     
  3. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    I have a multimeter and mostly know how to use it.

    I did not get any pictures today, but I will see if I can get some tomorrow.

    I am glad to hear that it is not dangerous, I heard a story on the TV last year that was "local man killed trying to fix his microwave" it turned out he did have it un-plugged, but the capacitors killed him. I just did not want to be the "local man killed trying to fix a radio" the only time I have been really electrocuted is the time I decided to see what is inside a disposable camera.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2012
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yeah, microwave ovens have a very high voltage stored on the capacitors. It's a completely different beast.
     
  5. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    Well I took a look at it today. I have now am pretty sure that it is either the coil or the power cord (It looks kind of bad.)

    there is the complication, the wires for the battery connection go through part of that board too. One of the things on the board that the batteries do not go through is the coil. I also see no visible damage to other components except the cord that looks kind of tired. I can not get the board that far out of the radio because it is connected with a few wires. Once I cut the wires it will not work with the batteries either until I put it back in. I can not get to any of the terminals for the cord, the coil, or any thing else until I get it all the way out.

    there is no switch for going from ac to batteries.
     
  6. duke37

    duke37

    5,364
    769
    Jan 9, 2011
    I could not get at the power supply part of the circuit diagram.

    Normally, the change over switch from AC to DC is built into the socket into which the power leads fits.

    Start by measuring the resistance between the power connections at the plug with the lead plugged in.
    If no connection, unplug the lead and check each wire in the lead for resistance.
    Check the resistance between the two input terminals on the set.
    If no connection, you will need to switch the set on or find your jemmy!
     
  7. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    here are some pictures. I did get it all of the way out and labeled the wires on one of these pictures.

    I have replaced the power cord (old on is still on in the pictures) because while it was still sort of connecting, it was not a very good connection. I have not put it back in the radio and tested it.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Measure (on the power cord) the transformer primary resistance.
    Is there a mains voltage range switch?
     
  9. dorpmuller

    dorpmuller

    2
    0
    Jul 27, 2012
    Hey, PtrkLnk, you still got this radio? I'll buy it off you.

    richpalm(AT)dejazzd(DOT)com

    Been restoring radios for 30 years, not a scumbag reseller. It'd get a good forever home.

    Rich
     
  10. PtrkLnk

    PtrkLnk

    26
    0
    Jan 20, 2012
    I have a friend that bought it from me. They were able to fix it and really seem to like it so I don't think that they would sell it.
     
  11. dorpmuller

    dorpmuller

    2
    0
    Jul 27, 2012
    Ask your friend if he wants to sell... still looking for one of these.

    Rich
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,449
    2,809
    Jan 21, 2010
    Whilst you're good at asking, you're pretty bad at reading replies.

    The OP has replied that they are unlikely to want to sell.

    Your insistence only suggests that this item is collectable and that it may be worth more to you that the OP or his friend may realise.

    I would recommend that the OP let's his friend know to do some googling before he sells it to someone who thinks he may be able to rip off an unsuspecting seller.
     
  13. Shortywave

    Shortywave

    1
    0
    Dec 27, 2014
    FYI...I purchased this radio while in Vietnam in 1971. I still use it as my main SWR radio. I paid $75.00 for it new at the base PX and would listen to Hanoi for their american casulities at night and also for music and news from Australia. It still works very well and really pulls in the stations. It is hooked up to a "L" antenna about 75 feet long stretched N/S and E/W with a center feed wire in the middle. I think it is right up there with the best of the receivers I have had in my collection.
     
  14. bob anthony

    bob anthony

    2
    0
    Mar 19, 2015
    What a coincedence, I found this website because I am trying to repace the antenna on my 1600. I bought mine in VN in 1971 also, I was just beginning my 2nd tour as a MACV advisor. I wound up staying for my 3rd tour and used that radio as a back up confirmation of the cease fire in 73. I was a CPT and was a distict advisor. Please contact me
     
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