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Sony SLV-N71 VCR Repair?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Puddin' Man, Jan 23, 2009.

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  1. Puddin' Man

    Puddin' Man Guest

    Greetings,

    I've been running Sony SLV-N71 VCR's for years.

    One failed this week. When I attempted play-back, I got a mixture of play-back
    image and audio/video static.

    Perhaps most importantly, when I set the remote to 'video' with no tape playing,
    I get a blue screen, some audio static, and a weird (and loud) 'scratch-scratch'
    sound that repeats endlessly. When I set the remote to 'TV', I get the normal
    reception images (tuned from a cable box).

    I assume this is a serious problem. If it might be repairable, even requiring
    cannibalized parts, I'd like to know about it.

    I'm not tremendously adept at electronic repair, but I'm willing to try, can
    solder a little, etc.

    Thanks,
    Puddin'

    "Take Yo' Hand Out My Pocket (I Ain't Got Nothing What Belongs To You)!"
    - Rice Miller, who probably never even _heard_ of GW Bush, Paulson, etc
     
  2. Guest

    Clean the heads. Sounds like a head clog.

     
  3. Puddin' Man

    Puddin' Man Guest

    Cleaned the heads. Twice.

    No help.

    P


    "Take Yo' Hand Out My Pocket (I Ain't Got Nothing What Belongs To You)!"
    - Rice Miller, who probably never even _heard_ of GW Bush, Paulson, etc
     


  4. Most often the control-track head is a bit dirty. This is the lower gap on
    the audio-control head. Seen it on this series often.

    BTW this was considered a throwaway model. Sony never had parts or service
    literature on the SLV-N series.

    Mark Z.
     
  5. Puddin' Man

    Puddin' Man Guest

    I've checked and cleaned it 3 times. It's clean as a whistle.
    As I've discovered in recent days.

    I've got the front and back off the unit. Inspected the bottom of the main
    board. No burnt components, visably cracked solder joints, etc.

    I'll keep looking, 'though I don't know what I'm looking for. :-(

    Thx,
    P

    "Take Yo' Hand Out My Pocket (I Ain't Got Nothing What Belongs To You)!"
    - Rice Miller, who probably never even _heard_ of GW Bush, Paulson, etc
     
  6. G B

    G B Guest

    I'm wondering if your scratch-scratch sound is similar to my poping noise.
    My noise occurs while the VCR is in a standby power state. It makes a
    "pop-pop" noise in the TV speakers. Which I have assumed is the VCR power
    supply shutting itself down, then re-powering itself up. I can actually
    watch the motors rotate after the power appears to return from the short
    shutdown. (I can see my clock display return at approx. the same time.)
    Of course mine only happens when it is in the stand-by (off) power.. it
    works fine when playing tapes. The pop-pop occurs about once every two or
    three seconds... I'm working on a SVL-N750
     
  7. Puddin' Man

    Puddin' Man Guest

    Not certain why it would do that ...
    I doubt it's the same problem, but I wouldn't be surprised to find
    that it's the same component(s) causing the problems. My N71 seemed
    OK until I switched to "video" or tried to record.

    P

    "Take Yo' Hand Out My Pocket (I Ain't Got Nothing What Belongs To You)!"
    - Rice Miller, who probably never even _heard_ of GW Bush, Paulson, etc
     
  8. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    You know, if it was me, I'd be looking in thrift stores for a 'new' VCR.
    I've bought a couple lately for less than $5. At that price, if you
    run into a problem unit, you either chalk it up to bad luck and buy
    another one; or you fix it...provided you were able to find one of the
    better-made models.

    Seriously, they're practically dime-a-dozen these days. Unless you're
    determined to fix this one, a better one is probably less than $10 away.

    jak
     
  9. Puddin' Man

    Puddin' Man Guest

    Thanks, but I was aware of all that.

    SLV-N71's have the feature set I need. I have several of them. This
    is the 2nd that has failed in precisely this fashion. If I could
    learn to repair this problem, they'd likely work 'till I'm in the grave.

    And I hate cheap VCR's. And the last thing I need is another remote.

    P

    "Take Yo' Hand Out My Pocket (I Ain't Got Nothing What Belongs To You)!"
    - Rice Miller, who probably never even _heard_ of GW Bush, Paulson, etc
     
  10. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    Actually, I hold out for more expensive VCRs; but I'll take a cheap one
    if it's for a secondary system. The thrift inventory is such that the
    good ones come along with regularity. You can even specialize in
    particular brands--even specific models--if you're patient.

    Oh, and don't worry about another remote. Likely you won't get one....

    <BG>

    jak
     
  11. Hi!
    Well, with many things that don't work properly...I'd look for something
    that would be common to large areas of the circuitry. Have you checked the
    voltages coming off the power supply to make sure they're stable? The
    voltages may be printed on the circuit board, if the power supply is on a
    separate board. If they're not, you'll have to guess. That won't be as bad
    as it seems, since the voltages should be stable when you measure them.
    Unstable output means a problem or poor design.

    Just about every VCR power supply I've ever seen runs hot when the unit is
    on and doing something. This can take its toll, especially on components
    like electrolytic capacitors where heat will dry them out.

    If you're willing to try, I see no reason not to. Try to figure out exactly
    what functions don't work, and look for things in the circuitry that would
    be common. You might draw a map of how things interact with one another if
    you can figure that out.

    If you do find that the fix won't be cost-effective or easy, I second the
    recommendation to look for other VCRs in secondhand stores and thrift shops.
    Older ones in particular are well built, some have impressive features and
    capabilities, and more of the components are separate, which makes figuring
    out which part does what that much easier. Newer VCRs tend to have very
    integrated assemblies, and may even have only one circuit board with a few
    ICs on it. In fact, if you want, you might buy an old broken VCR and build
    your skills by fixing it first. It would only cost a few dollars to find
    out.

    William
     
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