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Sony Handycam ccd-f55 viewfinder pinout

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Matthew Domb, May 12, 2004.

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  1. Matthew Domb

    Matthew Domb Guest

    I have a viewfinder from a broken camcorder that I would like to convert to
    a little TV / monitor, but I don't know the pinout for it.

    Does anybody know the pinout for it?
    If so, please respond soon!

    Thanks in advance.


    - Matthew Domb
     
  2. Mike

    Mike Guest

    From a similar model, if you have a 4 pin connector between the camcorder
    and the CRT/board, then your 4 pins are likely to be

    1: LED (for record mode, ground this leg to light LED).
    2: Composite video
    3: 0v (and video return)
    4: 5v (Supply at around 100ma)

    With some very basic probing around you should be able to identify the
    ground leg (0v) -- check continuity to the outer of any phono/jack connectors,
    or any large screening cans in the camcorder.

    If the camcorder's not entirely dead, you should also be able to find the 5v
    supply line to the CRT module by simply measuring between the known ground
    and each other pin.

    From there you have a 50-50 chance on the video input: Power up the
    viewfinder and stuff a composite video signal into the remaining 2 pins and
    see what happens :)

    That's how I found the pinout ...

    You may need to fit a 75ohm resistor between the composite video in to the
    viewfinder and ground, depending on how it's designed and how you use it. I
    found I needed the resistor, otherwise the picture was overbright and washed
    out.

    Mike.
     
  3. Matthew Domb

    Matthew Domb Guest

    I haven't been able to get it to work so far, but I'll try some more. It has
    a six pin connector.

    Notes so far.

    Pin# | Trace Thickness | Ideas?
    --------------------------------------
    1 | Thick Trace | LED
    2 | Thick Trace | LED
    3 | Thin Trace | Video?
    4 | Thin Trace | Video?
    5 | Thick Trace | Unknown
    6 | Thick Trace | Unknown


    I've heard of some viewfinders having separate horizontal/vertical sync
    connections before, so perhaps that is the case?


    --

    - Matthew Domb
     
  4. Mike

    Mike Guest

    That's scuppered my pinout then :)
    Possibly: The CRT ones I've dismembered are a self contained b/w monitor,
    taking composite video in. Which of course needs the sync recovering and
    splitting out, so if it's available in the camcorder, why not keep it
    separate? ... seems a good plan. If this *is* the case you'd need a sync
    separator IC too to drive it.

    It is a CRT viewfinder, not LCD, right?
     
  5. Matthew Domb

    Matthew Domb Guest

    Yes, it's a CRT. In a day or two I'm going to post some pictures on a
    website.

    What is sync recovering and splitting out?
     
  6. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Somewhere in the camera is a chip that is driving the CCD to collect the
    image. It knows when the right moments are when horizontal and vertical
    sync take place. Makes sense?

    On the unit you were speculating about :-

    .... these sync signals would be sent on their own independent wires to the
    viewfinder module, along with power, and the b/w or colour video signal.

    The viewfinder module can directly use those signals to generate appropriate
    sweep patterns to build up a picture on the tube, like any other TV device
    has to.

    But ...

    In other units, the sync signal will be embedded into the video stream
    (composite video, like you'd find on a SCART plug, or on the RCA/Cinch jack
    VIDEO IN/OUT on your VCR).

    So the viewfinder needs to "recover" the sync: That is, extract the short
    (horizontal) and long (vertical) sync pulses to drive the horizontal and
    vertical sweep generators.

    So ...

    *If* your viewfinder expects separate H and V sync signals to operate, then
    it should be getting them from the camera guts. But as you are using the
    viewfinder elsewhere, then you will have to fake the syncs up using a
    "sync separator" circuit. There's a few ICs that will do this in one chip +
    a couple of capacitors, so it's not hard, just a nuisance :)

    Google on LM1881 as a starting point.

    Mike.
     
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