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Solid Capacitor Identification Assistance Requested

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by datashifter, Feb 21, 2014.

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  1. datashifter

    datashifter

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    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    I managed to knock a capacitor off a circuit board ripping out one of its leads in the process, and I have no idea how to identify these puppies to source a replacement. Attached is a picture of a nearby capacitor with the same physical dimensions and identical markings.

    Markings are:

    33
    VHC.
    1L5


    ANY help anybody could provide would be very, very much appreciated.

    Thank you very much in advance!


    --datashifter
     

    Attached Files:

  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,866
    1,958
    Sep 5, 2009
    hi ther
    welcometo the foruns :)

    its a surface mount 33uF electrolytic capacitor probably ~ 6 - 10V rating

    Dave
     
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    Show us what the original capacitor looks like now (a photo of the bottom of it) and the area of board where you knocked it from.

    Depending on the damage you may need to replace it with something else or it may even be beyond repair.

    The caps themselves aren't that hard to source if you know where to look :)
     
  4. datashifter

    datashifter

    6
    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    I'll run into work in a few minutes to snap pics of the damaged cap.

    Thanks for the replies!
     
  5. datashifter

    datashifter

    6
    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    Dimensions are 6.5mm diameter, 7.33mm tall (not including the plastic base).

    I'm not concerned with the damage to the circuit trace in the pics, I can patch that without issue. I'm just not 100% sure what the voltage or capacitance rating is.

    The board's power supply is 24vdc and the cap is very close to the power molex plug. I have not yet chased the circuit traces but it appears to be the main power filtering cap for the board. I damaged it, snapped a pic of an undamaged cap, searched for the best forum I could find in the hopes of getting a positive ID of the cap, created the thread with the pic and went home before I did more damage.

    Ideally I would like to figure out who the manufacturer is and look at their datasheets to decypher the markings and source an identical cap. I'm used to old school electrolytics whose ratings are right there on the can. This is my first damaged "solid state electrolytic" cap, but electronics repairs are very old hat for me.

    If I cannot get a positive ID on the manufacturer I'll drag my BK Precision model 830 capacitance meter into work on Monday and desolder the undamaged cap to verify 33uF, but I'd still be clueless about the voltage rating...

    If you can ID this puppy, please assist.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
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    Jan 21, 2010
    OK, you've destroyed the capacitor, but the damage to the board is not too bad.

    First thing to do is to desolder the remains of the capacitor without breaking the track that's partially lifted.

    Next thing is to glue down the track right at the very end with a small spot of epoxy adhesive. Try not to get *any* on the top of the track. and to have the track as flat against the board as you can manage (press it down with a screwdriver or similar while the epoxy goes off if required)

    Then take another photo. Depending on how good the repair is, you might be able to solder a new surface mount chip back there. This style is very easy to solder with a conventional soldering iron.

    If you have any questions, ask before you try something you're unsure of. Better a delay than do something badly wrong.

    I think you have a good chance to make the repair in such a way that nobody would notice.
     
  7. datashifter

    datashifter

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    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    Fudge it.

    Until I can identify the manufacturer of that capacitor, I'm going to repair the circuit trace, measure the capacitance of the undamaged cap and put in a RadioShack equivalent electrolytic cap with at least a 24VDC rating. That project needs to be deployed Monday, and it's not like it's going into outer space - I can rework it later if I figure out who made that cap, or if I take a working voltage measurement to find out exactly what I need.

    Expect some pics of my substitution sometime next week! :)
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    You've got the capacitance and voltage rating from Dave earlier. The black stripe on the top indicates the negative terminal.

    If you're careful you can replace it with a through hole component -- trim the leads and form the before you solder it in place.

    The manufacturer is not important, only the physical size, capacitance, and voltage rating. You can use one with a higher (but not lower) voltage rating.
     
  9. datashifter

    datashifter

    6
    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    Yes sir, you know it!

    The "fudge it" bit was due to the culmination of my frustrations with the situation I caused coming to a head and my resigning to a RatShack fix, which was not what I wanted. It was not meant to be disrespectful to either of you two.

    I'm gonna get that board patched up Monday after RatShack opens at 10am, and get that project deployed. I'll post pics of my repair job in the event you should desire to review them.

    I greatly appreciate the help you guys have given me. Thank you both!
     
  10. datashifter

    datashifter

    6
    0
    Feb 21, 2014
    It is indeed a 33uF cap, but the operational voltage is 24vdc as measured from the board it is to replace. Attached is a pic of the patch job.

    Now I'm off to RadioShack for a replacement cap!
     

    Attached Files:

  11. kpatz

    kpatz

    329
    88
    Feb 24, 2014
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,839
    Jan 21, 2010
    Looks like a good repair of the traces. It also looks like you're very lucky that you didn't bump it the other way.

    I note the voltage you read and the comment about the voltage rating for the cap. 35V would be a rating I would expect to find given the supply voltage.
     
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