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soldering enamelled wire

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by meirman, Jan 31, 2005.

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  1. meirman

    meirman Guest

    Is it necessary to clean the enamel from enamelled wire before
    soldering it?

    I have a vague recollection that I read that it wasn't, and I only
    have a couple little stubs that I'm afraid will beak off if I move
    them around at all. (These are part of the 110volt winding in step
    down transformer.)

    Meirman
     
  2. Marko

    Marko Guest

    Of course solder won't stick to the enamel, but enamel will melt in
    the presence of molten solder. So, just apply a heat and solder and
    you should have no problem.

    Alternatively, there is a product called Strip-X that will disolve the
    enamel. You can also scrape the enamel off with a knife or sand
    paper. I prefer the molten solder approach.

    Marko
     
  3. meirman

    meirman Guest

    In sci.electronics.repair on Mon, 31 Jan 2005 13:09:24 -0800 Jamie
    Thanks to both of you. I'm sure any of these will do it. (Won't decide
    which one to try until I sit down at the bench.)

    Meirman
     
  4. << Is it necessary to clean the enamel from enamelled wire before
    soldering it?

    I have a vague recollection that I read that it wasn't, and I only
    have a couple little stubs that I'm afraid will beak off if I move
    them around at all. (These are part of the 110volt winding in step
    down transformer.) >>

    Meirman-

    There are some kinds of coating that burn off from the heat of a soldering
    iron, but others are quite heat resistant. If the insulation won't burn off,
    you will have to scrape it, use a chemical like Strip-X or use sandpaper. From
    what you say, it will be delicate any way you go!

    Consider that after soldering, long wires will exert forces on the stubs any
    time they move. It would be a good idea to provide some kind of support like
    a nearby terminal strip, that can buffer the mechanical forces of longer wires.

    Fred
     
  5. Jamie

    Jamie Guest

    acetone ( fingernail polish remover).
     
  6. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    Solder will not work with enamel. The enamel is a type of insulation. You
    must burn or scrape it off to get the solder to work with it.

    --

    Jerry G.
    =====

    Is it necessary to clean the enamel from enamelled wire before
    soldering it?

    I have a vague recollection that I read that it wasn't, and I only
    have a couple little stubs that I'm afraid will beak off if I move
    them around at all. (These are part of the 110volt winding in step
    down transformer.)

    Meirman
     
  7. Ol' Duffer

    Ol' Duffer Guest

    Don't know what they're using these days, but used to
    be two kinds called solvar and formvar. IIRC, solvar
    is softer and melts away at soldering temperatures
    almost acting like flux, while formvar is more durable
    and you can burn it off with a lot of heat but you may
    not get a good solder joint and chemical or abrasive
    cleaning is recommended. If in doubt, clean.
     
  8. JURB6006

    JURB6006 Guest

    Yes you must get the enamel off. The best way to do this I've seen thusfar is
    to tin it. That is attempt to tin the enameled wire until the enamel
    melts/burns/whatever off.

    Usually then you got a nice tinned surface which will make a good connection.
    In fact, in a blob of solder there is no atmosphere, so not only have you not
    nicked the wire, or shaved any of it off, there will be less corrosion and the
    sweating will go even better.

    Mid-aged hillbilly with an engineering degree taught me this. Amazing what it
    takes some times eh ?

    JURB
     
  9. Chemical stripper with a formic acid basis.
    works very well.
     
  10. NSM

    NSM Guest

    There are two types of enamel in use. One is self fluxing - needs no
    removal. Try soldering - if it doesn't work scrape the enamel off with an
    exacto knife.
     
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