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soi cmos for rfic

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by jason, Aug 16, 2005.

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  1. jason

    jason Guest

    Hello All

    Anyone who deal with or understand the challenges of using soi cmos for
    rfic design?
    Is the trend good and how does it go?

    Kindly share with me

    Thank you

    Jason
     
  2. SOI CMOS for RF? Why not GaAs or SiGe? SOI CMOS is more of a logic
    process.
     
  3. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Yes, it's good.
    That's what I get paid to do ;-)

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  4. CMOS is dirt cheap, and incredibly pliable even without SOI.
    See the paper by Doan et al, in the 2004 IEEE Solid State Conference.
    His slides are at
    bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/RF/Publication/pubs/Doan_ISSCC04_slides.pdf

    Regards,
    Mikko
     
  5. The question was specifically about SOI. AFAIK, SOI is more of a logic
    process. Is anyone doing serious RF in SOI? I know there is some
    analog (PLLs etc.).
     
  6. Guest

    Keith Williams skrev:
    I believe SiliconWave does (did?) a Bluetooth transciever in SOI,
    siw1502

    -Lasse
     
  7. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Honeywell in Maryland did, though I think that operation is now shut
    down.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  8. Phil Hobbs

    Phil Hobbs Guest


    We do, I believe. Back in the dim distant days when we made laptops
    (i.e. before May 2005) we did all the wifi stuff ourselves. Some was
    SiGe, but not all. We're still supplying Lenovo, as well as a lot of
    other customers.

    Cheers,

    Phil Hobbs

    IBM T. J. Watson Research Center
    Yorktown Heights NY
     
  9. jason

    jason Guest

    Thank you All for the comment.
    But why there are comments on Good things of SOi while some even shut
    down their plant or production?
    Will cmos soi become mainstream of cmos roadmap ?
    How does it benefit analog , Rf and digital domain respectively?

    Anyone knows?
    By the way, Jim, do you design soi cmos circuit for analog or rf
    circuit?
    Why did you choose soi for? Low noise or ?

    Hear from you all

    Thank you

    Jason
     
  10. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    Yield. Reproducibility.
    I don't think so. I've yet to see a stable process.
    Low stray capacitance to ground. Low crosstalk.
    High frequency. 1.6GHz GPS receiver.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  11. Many (most?) of the ThinkPads use "Centrino Technology", thus the WiFi
    is Intel's. A quick look shows the T40s, X31s, and R40s are Centrinos,
    anyway.

    http://www.pc.ibm.com/us/thinkpad/mobiletechnology/
     
  12. Phil Hobbs

    Phil Hobbs Guest

    Right, the 2 GHz ones are mostly Intel now--the challenges are at higher
    frequency.

    I know the guy who designs them--they started out with a 900 MHz
    cordless connection for a modem, way back before wifi. Now they have a
    60 GHz transceiver chip working, and 94 GHz in the works. They talked
    about it at ISSC '05, and are going to again at CICC in September, but I
    don't have the reference handy.

    Cheers,

    Phil Hobbs
     
  13. jason

    jason Guest

    Phil

    The 60GHz transceiver is made in SOI technology or bulk cmos or SIGe?

    Thanks

    Jason
     
  14. If Phil refers to the same Berkeley group I referred to
    earlier:
    http://bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/Research/RF/Publication/pubs/Doan_ISSCC04_slides.pdf
    that is bulk CMOS.
    As I am not collaborating with those guys (my colleagues
    here at VTT do) I'm not up-the-date with the details, though.

    Quoting from Doan et al "Design considerations for 60GHz
    CMOS radios" by Doan et al in the December 2004 issue of
    the IEEE Communications Magazine (p137):
    "A wideband general-purpose 60GHz amplifier has been designed
    and fabricated in a 130nm digital CMOS process with no special
    analog or RF oprions".

    Regards,
    Mikko
     
  15. jason

    jason Guest

    Thanks Mikko
    So it is a bulk cmos process.

    By the way, anyone here deals with device physics for a SOI device
    before?
    I need some advice.

    By the way Jim, how do you decide if you would go for fully or
    partially depleted soi?

    Hear from you all

    best regards
    Jason
     
  16. Jim Thompson

    Jim Thompson Guest

    I didn't. As is often the case, I was stuck with the client-selected
    process.

    ...Jim Thompson
     
  17. Phil Hobbs

    Phil Hobbs Guest

    I misspoke, sorry. The 60 GHz transceiver is SiGe bipolar. It was done
    by Brian Gaucher's group here at IBM Watson.

    Cheers,

    Phil Hobbs
     
  18. jason

    jason Guest

    Thanks Jim

    :)

    Jason
     
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