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small Speaker rating question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by grom, Apr 26, 2013.

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  1. grom

    grom

    23
    0
    Dec 5, 2010
    I was taking apart an old multimedia playing device and got a pair of small magnetic 2x1 cm^2 sized speakers. I thought of using the speakers for making a portable dock with an audio in... the speakers are are a little louder than the usual smartphone speakers... you could say they are as loud as the speakers on the Kindle 3 (the keyboard one).
    I was wondering if it would be possible to connect it up to an external music player directly without amplification.

    I'm scared to try it as something might happen to the mp3 player if the spkrs draw too much current. Is there any way to find the the power rating of the speaker? Does anyone have any ideas on the power output capability of a standard mp3 player with a 3.5 mm jack?

    note: the spkrs have no markings.
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    You should be fine, the output of most Mp3 players will drive pretty much anything from 8 Ohm (small desktop docks) to 32 Ohm (earphones)...
     
  3. grom

    grom

    23
    0
    Dec 5, 2010
    Hey... thanks for the reply... Tried what you suggested. It worked without any problems to the speaker or mp3 player. But the output is not as high as usual with these speakers. Even at max volume, it gives an output that can be heard only upto 2-3 feet (lower than smartphone spkr). I tried with two different mp3 players with the same result.
    I measured the resistance across the speaker. It shows 8.4-8.6 Ohms. Any thoughts?
     
  4. Yoa01

    Yoa01

    214
    0
    Jun 18, 2012
    I would recommend some sort of amplification before the speakers but after the audio device. This can easily be achieved with a simple amplifier circuit. I recommend using an LM386 because it's easy and generally cheap, but of course you can use just about any amplifier design, including a simple transistor amplifier.
     
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