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Sinking & sourcing current, pnp & npn

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Jani Miettinen, Sep 14, 2003.

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  1. I'm studying electronics on my own (as a hobby), reading right now
    Art of Electronics, browsing the web to fill some of the gaps (yes,
    there are quite some) and toying with CircuitMaker (which helps a
    lot to understand the stuff).

    Sinking and sourcing current have been referenced to several times,
    but they have never been explained in any usable detail. So, here
    are the questions -- for now, more might follow ;) :

    What is the difference between sinking and sourcing current?

    Pnp and npn transistors differ somehow in this respect -- but why,
    and what does that mean in practice?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. -------------------------
    It is like a switch upstream or downstream of a load.

    An NPN is best downstream of the load, emitter to ground, which sinks
    current to ground to turn on the load, and this is because it needs a
    base current provided by a voltage that shouldn't vary any more than it
    needs to in order to stabilize the turn-on point.

    The base current makes the collector path voltage drop suddenly grow
    and stand the base up higher so the base voltage has to grow as well,
    and it can chatter on or fail to turn-on evenly.

    If it was on top the load, as seen from a +V high, Ground low diagram,
    then the voltage needed to turn on the base would vary right when it
    was ramping up to turn-on, due to the voltage drop through the C-E path.

    The PNP is best upstream of load, upside down, emitter up to Vcc,
    because then we must ground the base to turn it on, and it mirrors the
    NPN case, except upside down, and prevents that base instability at
    turn-on.

    -Steve
     
  3. It can be a switch. It can also be a linear amp. I don't see any
    assumption that the question refers to switching use only.
    Well, I will query the use of the word "best" here. One can have a
    push-pull or source sink with either a collector output or emitter
    output. Both methods have disadvantages and advantages. Since this is
    your reply, I will it it to you to expand on this.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  4. The words sourcing and sinking just refer to the two possible
    directions of current. If the switch or control element is on the
    positive side of the load that switch or control element is said to
    source current. If the switch or control device is on the negative
    side of a load, it is said to be a current sink. This is all based on
    the convenient fiction (positive current convention) that current
    consists of positive charge moving. So a source lets charge reach the
    load, and a sink lets charge leave it (and sink down the drain).

    Not technical, at all (or even accurate).
     
  5. John Popelish wrote...
    Right. For conventional "current-source" circuits, which use the
    transistor's collector for their output, PNP or P-channel types
    can only source current and NPN or N-channel types can only sink
    current. But note, it's common practise in the industry to refer
    to both NPN and PNP types as "current sources," even though in fact
    the NPN type is a more accurately called a current sink.

    Enjoy your studies, Jani, and best wishes.

    p.s. Good book choice!

    Thanks,
    - Win
     
  6.  
  7. This does make sense.

    Earlier I experimented with op-amp integrator *) and found out that
    bipolar transistor could not be used (at least I couldn't figure
    out how) to reset the integrator capacitor due to the instability
    of turn-on point. I suspect this is somewhat a similar situation,
    but of course a bit different.

    *) like this: http://www.maxim-ic.com/tarticle/images/A207Fig01.gif
     
  8. It is! :)

    I have to say that reading The Art of Electronics is inpiring and
    enjoyable. It's amazing how you have managed to pack so much
    information into it without having it filled to overflowing.

    Figuring out why the bad circuits are bad circuits is probably one
    of the most educational parts of the book. At first, from the
    beginner's point of view, it seemed that absolutely nothing was
    wrong with them but soon it was clear why they would not work as
    advised.
     
  9. Rule two. Don't simplify so much that it becomes meaningless.

    Oh. You think so. If this were true, just why do you proposes that,
    essentially, all audio power amps use emitter follower outputs. This
    amounts to 10000's of designs, and billions of actual product sold. How
    do you explain that non emitter follower output op-amps are few and far
    between.



    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  10. --
    Want someone to fix your computer remotely?
    Check out Network info at this site:

    http://www.onecomputerguy.com/tips.htm
    Sinking is bringing the ckt to 0v or low. Sourcing is bringing the ckt to
    the source voltage or high.
    NPN is negative emitter, positive base, negative collector material.
    Biasing the base more negative caused conduction. More positive cuts it off.
    PNP is positive emitter, negative base, positive collector. Sourcing the
    base causes conduction. sinking the base cuts it off.
     
  11.  
  12. Its your reply, I don't want to intrude to much. I'll give you a hint
    though. Output impedance.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  13. ------------
    Which my switching examples didn't need to concern themselves with,
    of course. My point exactly in asking you to do the gain and stability
    analysis.

    -Steve
     
  14. But I pointed out that switching was not assumed in the question.

    Kevin Aylward

    http://www.anasoft.co.uk
    SuperSpice, a very affordable Mixed-Mode
    Windows Simulator with Schematic Capture,
    Waveform Display, FFT's and Filter Design.
     
  15.  
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