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Single, half, full-bridge PWM...

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by dtvonly, Nov 3, 2014.

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  1. dtvonly

    dtvonly

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    Mar 14, 2012
    Hi. Could someone please explain the differences between half and full-bridge (reverse and non-reverse) PWM? The single is easy. If possible, please include waveforms. Thank you.
     
  2. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    Where did you learn of these different types?
    PWM is pulse width modulation... in that for any given frequency configured by the equipment or user, you define the ratio that the line is high to low.
    So a 30% duty cycle will be high 30% of the time, and low for 70%.

    It sounds as though you are confusing two different items... Bridge rectification is usually used in power supplies for converting AC to DC. There is a full and half bridge, I am not familiar with reverse and non-reverse though.
     
  3. dtvonly

    dtvonly

    11
    0
    Mar 14, 2012

    Hi. Please see short insert from the PIC18F14K22 microchip's Microcontroller - on Enhanced PWM section (P.115)

    upload_2014-11-3_9-48-44.png
    Thanks.
     
  4. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
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    Jun 25, 2014
    This would be a gap in my experiences, but it just seems like different configurations to drive different bridge topologies, not necessarily changing the PWM output.
    I can't think of any reason why a PWM signal would be any different, but you may need to concern yourself with two opposing parts of a bridge being enabled at the same time. This function may help resolve that.

    Please take this as an observed possibility, and wait for someone to confirm or correct me.
     
  5. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,688
    Jan 5, 2010
    Half bridge and full bridge PWM on a PIC ECCP are means of driving a half-bridge or full H-bridge, typically for motor control. These allow either 2 or 4 outputs to control each of the switches in your half (2) or full (4) bridge. It also allows you to insert dead-time between the switching of the different switches so that you do not get shoot-though, which is when the top and bottom switches of a half bridge are both on at the same time.

    The waveforms should be there in the datasheet.

    Bob
     
    Gryd3 likes this.
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