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simple question

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by shadowflare99, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. shadowflare99

    shadowflare99

    29
    0
    Aug 7, 2012
    did a condensator

    4 uF at 220 Volt = 1.00 Coloumb
    have semilar job to a 3 uF at 400 V = 1.20 Coloumb...

    did the 20 % can make a really change in a system ?

    It's for a Fan...

    thank you
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2012
  2. john monks

    john monks

    693
    1
    Mar 9, 2012
    No.
    A Farad is a unity of capacity of a capacitor.
    The relationships are as follows:
    One coulomb is 6.24 X 10^18 electrons.
    One coulomb is equal to one ampere passing through a point for one second.
    One farad charged to one volt is one coulomb.
    the voltage on a capacitor is proportional to the charge on a capacitor or the coulombs of charge.
    The charge piles up on one plate of the capacitor and an equal deficit of electrons occurs on the other plate.

    Now you should be able to figure out how many coulombs of charge is on a one Farad capacitor at 220 Volts.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2012
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,174
    2,689
    Jan 21, 2010
    I'm pretty sure there aren't any commercially available 3F 400V capacitors.

    Could it be 3uF?
     
  4. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
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    May 8, 2012
    How big might that be? Perhaps the size of a 50gal drum? Baybe bigger?..1960's vintage Buick? :D
     
  5. shadowflare99

    shadowflare99

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    0
    Aug 7, 2012
    Oopps it's my error it's was 3UF 400 :)

    but i understand, because i didn't found a 4 uF at 220 V ..

    can i replace it by another thing ?
     
  6. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    Hard to tell. We don't know what circuit this is in.
     
  7. shadowflare99

    shadowflare99

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    Aug 7, 2012
    Ok.... I will try to find the same capacitor ... Thank you..
     
  8. gorgon

    gorgon

    603
    23
    Jun 6, 2011
    4.7uF is a standard value, and you don't want to use a capacitor up to its max voltage. I would never go further than 80% of the voltage on a regular basis.

    You should also know that most elecrolytic capacitors has low accuracy, and may have 10-20% more 'uF' than the marked value. So if you need an exact value you need to measure it yourself and make your calculations from that.

    TOK ;)
     
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