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Simple Power Pulse -- HOSP

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Dave, Dec 8, 2004.

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  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    This time of year the English Sparrows really seem like a swarm of
    locusts. They come and go in swarms. I was thinking it might be
    selective, humane, and efficient to provide a few special perches for
    them. Unlike trapping which can inadvertently stress other birds, or
    pellet guns which are often forbidden by local ordinances,
    inconvenient, inaccurate, and frighten other birds, this perch idea
    seems like it might be worth trying. The male English Sparrow likes to
    sit on top of birdhouses in any season as if staking a claim to them,
    or a hanging feeder could have a perch below the access hole. A careful
    identification of each bird would be possible before application of
    power as there are several similar native sparrow species.

    My initial thought is to use either an old television power transformer
    or a small neon lamp transformer with a relay activating the
    transformer primary via a remote (12V) push-button. The transformer and
    relay would sit in the basement. The momentary contact push-button
    would plug into a wall jack next to the window upstairs. The
    transformer secondary wires would feed out through a PVC piped hole to
    the backyard. I do not know how conductive the feet of sparrows are and
    I do not know what their reaction time is relative to 16.7mS. I wonder
    if rather than momentary 60Hz I should instead discharge a cap into the
    primary of the transformer? Any thoughts?

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
  2. CFoley1064

    CFoley1064 Guest

    Subject: Simple Power Pulse -- HOSP
    AN EVENING (WASTED) WITH TOM LEHRER
    Poisoning Pigeons in the Park

    Spring is here, a-suh-puh-ring is here.
    Life is skittles and life is beer.
    I think the loveliest time of the year is the spring.
    I do, don't you? 'Course you do.
    But there's one thing that makes spring complete for me,
    And makes every Sunday a treat for me.

    All the world seems in tune
    On a spring afternoon,
    When we're poisoning pigeons in the park.
    Every Sunday you'll see
    My sweetheart and me,
    As we poison the pigeons in the park.

    When they see us coming, the birdies all try an' hide,
    But they still go for peanuts when coated with cyanide.
    The sun's shining bright,
    Everything seems all right,
    When we're poisoning pigeons in the park.

    We've gained notoriety,
    And caused much anxiety
    In the Audubon Society
    With our games.
    They call it impiety
    And lack of propriety,
    And quite a variety
    Of unpleasant names.
    But it's not against any religion
    To want to dispose of a pigeon.

    So if Sunday you're free,
    Why don't you come with me,
    And we'll poison the pigeons in the park.
    And maybe we'll do
    In a squirrel* or two,
    While we're poisoning pigeons in the park.

    We'll murder them all amid laughter and merriment,
    Except for the few we take home to experiment.
    My pulse will be quickenin'
    With each drop of strych'nine
    We feed to a pigeon.
    (It just takes a smidgin!)
    To poison a pigeon in the park.

    Notes
    * In 1998, Lehrer performed this song as part of a one-off show devoted
    to Sir Cameron Mackintosh, and substituted "sparrow" for "squirrel"

    http://members.aol.com/quentncree/lehrer/pigeons.htm
     
  3. CFoley1064

    CFoley1064 Guest

    Subject: Simple Power Pulse -- HOSP
    <snip>

    AN EVENING (WASTED) WITH TOM LEHRER
    Poisoning Pigeons in the Park

    * In 1998, Lehrer performed this song as part of a one-off show devoted
    to Sir Cameron Mackintosh, and substituted "sparrow" for "squirrel"

    http://members.aol.com/quentncree/lehrer/pigeons.htm

    Spring is here, a-suh-puh-ring is here.
    Life is skittles and life is beer.
    I think the loveliest time of the year is the spring.
    I do, don't you? 'Course you do.
    But there's one thing that makes spring complete for me,
    And makes every Sunday a treat for me.

    All the world seems in tune
    On a spring afternoon,
    When we're poisoning pigeons in the park.
    Every Sunday you'll see
    My sweetheart and me,
    As we poison the pigeons in the park.

    When they see us coming, the birdies all try an' hide,
    But they still go for peanuts when coated with cyanide.
    The sun's shining bright,
    Everything seems all right,
    When we're poisoning pigeons in the park.

    We've gained notoriety,
    And caused much anxiety
    In the Audubon Society
    With our games.
    They call it impiety
    And lack of propriety,
    And quite a variety
    Of unpleasant names.
    But it's not against any religion
    To want to dispose of a pigeon.

    So if Sunday you're free,
    Why don't you come with me,
    And we'll poison the pigeons in the park.
    And maybe we'll do
    In a squirrel* or two,
    While we're poisoning pigeons in the park.

    We'll murder them all amid laughter and merriment,
    Except for the few we take home to experiment.
    My pulse will be quickenin'
    With each drop of strych'nine
    We feed to a pigeon.
    (It just takes a smidgin!)
    To poison a pigeon in the park.
     
  4. I hope this is a troll. What you are carefully implying is absolutely
    illegal and if you can be traced you will be prosecuted for animal
    cruelty.

    In fact, the RSPB is concerned about the dramatic decrease in house-
    sparrow populations and indeed here they have very noticeably declined,
    possibly due to the rise in magpie population; the magpies relish a
    sparrow chick for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
     
  5. Anders F

    Anders F Guest

    I'm not quite sure the buddhists (excuse my spelling, you know who I mean)
    would agree...

    ;-)
     
  6. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Not on this side of the pond it isn't. The House aka English Sparrow
    (Passer domesticus) is considered non-native vermin, an invasive
    species which has caused serious declines in several species of native
    birds and is definitely not protected. What I propose is merely a very
    humane method of shortening their miserable lives. The same method is
    applied to humans over here and not considered "cruel" or "unusual.".

    See: http://audubon-omaha.org/bbbox/ban/hsbyse.htm
    http://www.sialis.org/hosp.htm
    If they can identify the cause it might be of great interest over here.
    Regards,

    Dave
     
  7. Dave

    Dave Guest

    Not good since it might get into the food chain.
     
  8. Apart form that, History shows that all these God-Games tend to backfire; an
    ecosystem has it's own agenda and if you try to push it, it will find a
    different way. Maybe a more unpleasant one even. If you want the native
    species back, you have to re-create conditions favoured by native species -
    the house sparrow is there now because conditions are now more favorable to
    *it*.
    Sure - just like cooking a lobster, except not so repeatable! There must be
    some satisfying vids/pictures on http://www.rotten.com - although *I* would
    not go there.
     
  9. Dave

    Dave Guest

    The native species favor an environment without people. The HOSP thrive
    only where there are people. Maybe a bio-terrorist will someday set
    things right again but in the meanwhile I'm not going to allow the
    other species to be driven out. Should be far more humane than
    shooting, trapping or poisoning. Neutering them is not an option. Maybe
    you are also a vegetarian so as to not cause any animal suffering?
     
  10. It may not be protected but I think it's likely that there are cruelty
    laws that apply even to vermin.
    It is by me and many, many others.
     
  11. CFoley1064

    CFoley1064 Guest

    Subject: Re: Simple Power Pulse -- HOSP
    Actually, Tom Lehrer wrote it.

    I guess I'm showing my age. I'd assumed that no engineer would not have heard
    of Tom Lehrer. He's a mathematician who attained his PhD at Harvard, and
    incidentally also a satirist who had something of an on-again-off-again musical
    career in the '50s and '60s. As far as I know, he's still teaching math at UC
    Santa Cruz. He'd be in his mid-seventies now.

    Here are some links. Personally, I always thought he was the funniest guy in
    the known universe (at least until I started reading newsgroups ;-). I've got
    his albums, and listen to them a couple of times a year.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Lehrer
    http://home.teleport.com/~osh/leher.htm
    http://www.tomlehrer.org/
    http://www.theonionavclub.com/feature/index.php?issue=3619&f=1

    By the way, I figured the OP was tongue-in-cheek, so I responded in similar
    fashion. No offense meant, either to you or to sparrows.

    Chris
     
  12. Dave

    Dave Guest

    John Woodgate wrote:
    Please feel free to explain a 'humane" method then.
     
  13. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    A "Humane" way of killing? There isn't any. If you kill, you must take
    responsibility and admit that you are a killer.

    Then, preferably, stop.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  14. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    I heard about some building with a terrible pigeon problem, and some
    clever fellow thought of just stealing their eggs. Since they're not
    alive, but only ova, it's not murder, right? Problem is, when their
    eggs go missing, they lay more. Danged tenacious life! ;-) So what they
    (the humans that didn't like the pigeons pooping on their windowsills)
    started doing was carefully, with gloves so you don't leave human smell,
    take the eggs and boil them, deconstituting the ovum, and put them back in
    the nest, so the pigeons think they still have eggs. It didn't say what
    the pigeons do when the boiled eggs in their nest start to rot.

    Good Luck!
    Rich
     
  15. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Yeah, you're going to eat a pigeon that died of poisoning. Maybe Darwin's
    food chain! ;-)
    Tom Lehrer was one of my idols back in those days. I actually spent almost
    a whole day transcribing and memorizing "The Elements." This was
    particularly apropos since that year I was in a High School performance of
    "The Pirates of Penzance," so I recognized the tune right away[0]. I even
    modified it to include lawrencium, which was just new since he wrote the
    song. Nowadays, since they're inventing new elements just about every day,
    you'd have to add a whole nother verse.

    Cheers!
    Rich

    [0] It was "I Am The Very Model Of A Modern Major-General." Interestingly,
    the kid who played the Maj.Gen., happened to be dating the gal who sang
    Mabel. I was merely Samuel, the pirate lieutanant.
     
  16. John Fields

    John Fields Guest

     
  17. Let loose of the idea of killing through an attitude change, I suppose.

    I have a small farm with perhaps some 40 free-ranging birds -- chickens, quail,
    pheasants, guineas, ducks, and geese. We also have at least one pack of coyotes
    nearby and a group of hawks that live in some trees on my property. Both
    present a problem to me, but killing either wasn't acceptable.

    The coyotes would make a mad rush through the birds and just focus on the one or
    two that didn't make it to safety in the flurry. The solution to this was to
    break up the land with strategically placed barriers so that by the time they
    navigated them the birds were safe. The coyotes don't bother me anymore, though
    I still hear them and know they are around.

    The hawks required several factors. The guineas play an important role, as do
    the banties -- both are sharp-eyed and set off the warnings early. Also, we
    noticed that the Jays (both Stellar's and scrub) really don't like the hawks
    (because the hawks grab them and eat them, I suppose) and will attack the hawks,
    chasing them in groups. The hawks hate it. And the Jays LOVE peanuts in the
    shell. So we spread out peanuts every so often to make sure that the Jays hang
    around our homesite. The hawks don't even bother, anymore. I just watch them
    as they fly overhead and go to other places to hunt and then return.

    I'm ever aware of the situation and know that it can change, but it's a price
    I'm willing to pay. Shooting the hawks and coyotes (or poisoning them) would
    have been a possibility, I suppose, and it might permanently solve their threat.
    But there is a balance in life and it's likely that there are other animals that
    would move in, such as raccoons (predator) or rabbits (going after our
    vegetables) and perhaps mice and rats, which themselves would just present yet
    another set of issues. And genocide to all of them just to keep life in the
    world around me at bay would just mean a sterile environment, absent of life.

    Being a human being with our own interests shouldn't have to become a deadly
    presence in the lives of other animals.

    Jon
     
  18. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    If I stop killing, I die?

    I release that judgement.

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  19. Dave

    Dave Guest

    So I can eat meat and still be a saint as long as the butcher does the
    killing?
     
  20. You must kill to eat, even if you are a veggan or only eat yeast. You must
    first kill something to gain the nutrients you need. Or have you somehow
    developed a method for humans to thrive on energy from the sun.

    Charles.
     
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