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Simple DC Power Supply

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by bornbkjp, Jun 21, 2013.

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  1. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013
    Does this look right I'm new at this . I need a simple DC power supply to run a tattoo machine which is no more that a coil door bell but I need Smooth DC . The machine works well just want to know if it looks right would it help to add another Capacitor or anything else. I used a 12.5 V 3 amp transformer machines never going more then 1 amp is it OK to use the 3 amp transformer .. Thank you guys for all the help !!!
     

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    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  2. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    Sep 5, 2009
    hi there
    welcome to the forums :)

    yup that looks cool :)

    do you actually know how much current the tattoo machine draws ?
    1A? 2A or whatever ?

    Dave
     
  3. Number

    Number

    65
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    Jun 9, 2013
    If you want smooth DC consider a voltage regulator. I'm not sure if the large capacitor is more helpful than having several smaller capacitors or not.
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    It might work. The voltage will vary somewhat with load.

    I have no real experience with the power requirements of a tattoo machine or the effect when the power supplied has ripple or sags under load.

    Perhaps you could experiment with a leg of pork first? (What do you practice on???)
     
  5. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    those tattoo vibrator units dont need DC thats overly smooth .... since they in their action are already chopping the DC to shreads LOL

    Dave
     
  6. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013
    A machine might draw up to 1.5 amp I was told to have a power supply of at least 2amps
    its just two coils like the old door bells. I just wanted to keep it simple do I need to add a bleed resistor for the cap. Never done this before just guess work..Thanks for the help.
     

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  7. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013
    (What do you practice on???) People of course :)
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    you could stick a say 6.8k resistor across the cap if you wanted to
    dont think its really necessary tho
    The voltage nor the value of the cap is high
    bleeder resistors are often used in power supplies where the cap value may be 10,000 uF or more and the voltage across them 20V or more

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  9. Number

    Number

    65
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    Jun 9, 2013
    Oh true. That makes more sense. I don't see how having one would do any harm, but if it's irrelevant then I wouldn't use one. :cool:
     
  10. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013
    If I wanted to bring it down to 15 volts could I add a resistor and where and what kind, ohms , tolerance and watts .
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Unfortunately a simple series resistor is not going to reduce the voltage in the way that you want -- unless the tattoo vibrator represents a load that doesn't vary (with load typically).
     
  12. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013
    What does the 2.2k resistor do in this circuit ? and on the project I built can I use a larger cap then 4700uf to filter the dc some more ,was told in the old days they used car batteries, being a cleaner source of DC for running tattoo machines. also I am using a 3amp transformer in one I made, machines use just about one amp is the 3amp transformer I used Ok
     

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    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
  13. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    The 2k2 resistor provides a small load which discharges the capacitor when the power is off. It probably does little else.
     
  14. bornbkjp

    bornbkjp

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    Jun 21, 2013



    Is there a way to do it with a resistor and diode
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Not in any way that would be effective unless the load is substantially resistive.
     
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