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Simple AC to DC Questions

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Swimmer, Apr 10, 2004.

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  1. Swimmer

    Swimmer Guest

    I have a very old antenna rotator that I would like to power using a
    car battery. I am planning on using it with a 12-volt wind turbine
    and would like to use the power supplied by the wind turbine operate
    it. It was produced by The Alliance MFG. CO., model U98 11N5 V. 60,
    0.6 Amp, 65 Watt. If you can think of any simple way of converting
    this to DC (or if it is even possible) let me know.
     
  2. All AC powered rotators I have seen use AC motors (one in the control
    box and one on the rotator) that move in rough synchronism. Probably
    the easiest way to power these from DC is to add an inverter that
    creates 115 VAC from your DC source. A 100 watt inverter for 12 volt
    automotive use is pretty cheap.

    http://www.jcwhitney.com/webapp/wcs...10101&storeId=10101&langId=-1&TID=100&afsrc=1
     
  3. Seth Koster

    Seth Koster Guest

    Normal AC can be rectified with three basic circuits, the half wave
    rectifier, the full wave rectifier and the bridge rectifier.
    The half wave just puts a diode in the circuit, allowing only one
    half the AC waveform to flow while the negative half is cut off. The
    full wave uses two diodes and the center tap of a transformer to
    convert both halfwaves from each end of the transformer to positive
    while completing the path to the center tap (ground). The bridge
    uses four diodes to rectify without using a center tap (probably whant
    you want?). In any of these cases you'll get pulsating DC and will
    want to filter it using capacitance and/or inductance. Check out a
    google search on any of these and you should find a schematic (all
    very easy). A commercial unit will do this for you and probably a
    lot more (consider limiting overvoltage, shielding, etc.), but will
    probably cost a lot more than if you build the circuit up yourself.
    Polyphase AC uses other rectification configurations, so check your
    appliance out.
     
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