Connect with us

silly idea

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by donkey, Dec 26, 2014.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. donkey

    donkey

    1,286
    56
    Feb 26, 2011
    hey guys want to build a modified H-bridge which is actually a double H-bridge maybe even a triple
    a normal H-bridge gives a forward and reverse voltage and PWM. I am going to add a 3rd and 4th for left and right with PWM. and then maybe up and down too
    how would I read the outputs in a single chip? I need it to detect polarity and "strength" (strength refers to PWM)
    this is NOT for a motor but specifically for chips so current and volts would be best kept low. am trying to figure out if I can make a modified quantum computer chip to trial. speed would be good but most importantly is working right

    I am trying to understand this concept not trying to make a new wheel or anything. I really want to make several of these so that I could give a code to a H-bridge, this in turn manipulates the next etc. etc. etc. having different code affects end result etc. making the basis for a quantum computer.

    the part I am stuck on is logic and have come up with a concept of forward, reverse and neutral polarities. then PWM will control strength of polarity. so if for whatever reason I get a double + or double - from an axis it acts as no movement... this kind of goes against basic maths but may help logic a lot.

    so in short anyone have any idea how to read the polarities and strength and anyone have an idea how to make this convert to machine code for the basics of a quantum computer

    idea copyrighted by Phil 2014....... blah blah blah.... gimme money lol
     
  2. BobK

    BobK

    7,671
    1,681
    Jan 5, 2010
    Um, Donkey, were you sober when you posted?

    Bob
     
  3. profbuxton

    profbuxton

    15
    10
    Nov 22, 2014
    I think its a great idea with vast potential! Let us know when you have it working!
     
  4. donkey

    donkey

    1,286
    56
    Feb 26, 2011
    its just an idea to try and figure out the basics of qubits.
    reading up on it I understand so little so seeing it in action might make it make sense, only thing I can think of that comes close is an h-bridge, but has to be 3 dimensional, so 3 of them.
    but how to make this tri-bridge manipulate the next? is there a logic I have to adhere to? also getting the input of 1 "qubit" might be easy but getting several is another issue. I completely understand that people much smarter than I are trying to get this working, but having something that I can make at home to understand it might be fun
     
  5. BobK

    BobK

    7,671
    1,681
    Jan 5, 2010
    Quantum computers exist only in highly sophisticated physics labs and even then are very limited. They cannot be built from conventional electronics, They rely on the quantum states of individual atoms. Not ready for home use yet.

    Bob
     
  6. donkey

    donkey

    1,286
    56
    Feb 26, 2011
    bob while I appreciate your input I don't think you are grasping the concept.
    when studying chemistry you get those balls that represent an atom, different sizes with different number of holes to show how an atom works.
    can you use that to make drinkable water? not a chance in hell.
    the idea isn't to make a quantum computer its to show how they work. I see a lot of articles on the subatomic and such, but still have no idea what they are talking about. having something that can mimic a part of the computer might be a good step for me.
    I understand that there are thousands of parts but am still trying to understand how the subatomic particles they are talking about will be better than 1's and0's.... build one and see I say.
    how do you build something to mimic an electron floating around a nucleus.... you can't but you could represent it in 3d.... a standard Hbridge is 1 dimension so 2 more gives a basic idea of whats happening in the atom. now from that I could possibly try to work out how they plan on using a 3d graphed item to represent data.
    also it leaves me to ponder the standard logic gates... these literally work of 1's and 0's... but there is 1's and 0's and that other thingy in quantum computers... how will a gate work with this?.... how can I test it at home?
    do I think for a second its going to revolutionise the way people think about quantum computers? no way in heck... but hopefully it will give me a better understanding of what is going on in there
     
  7. BobK

    BobK

    7,671
    1,681
    Jan 5, 2010
    The unique thing about a quantum computer is that the Qbit can be 0 and 1 at the same time. Sure, you can simulate by making an exhaustive search of all possible combinations of Qbits, but that would not shed any light on how a quantum computer works. The quantum computer essentially does this entire exhaustive search in one operation. For example, if you could make a 64 Qbit quantum computer (today's technology is not even close to that). You could, in a single operation, try all possible 64-bit encryptions keys. Go ahead and simulate it, and you might get an answer in a few centuries.

    Bob
     
  8. donkey

    donkey

    1,286
    56
    Feb 26, 2011
    yeah that's what I am not understanding... this whole its 1 or 0 or both........ standard logic gates won't work on that will they? is there a quantum logic gate that I can't find that helps make the computer do what its supposed to do
    understanding basic logic its like telling a kid he's in trouble.... it could be because he threw a rock at a school kid, it could be because he hasn't cleaned his room.... it could be both, or it could be something else entirely. until you know why you can't come to a conclusion at all. I think this is another I squared issue.... I hated that.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-