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Serial or Parallel ADC?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Jack// ani, Mar 24, 2005.

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  1. Jack// ani

    Jack// ani Guest

    Hi all,

    I want to interface my PIC uC with external ADC, I want to know which
    is more easy and better a serial ADC or a parallel ADC?

    Thanks
     
  2. Slower ADCs use the serial interface while faster
    ones are connected in parallel.

    Rene
     
  3. Luhan Monat

    Luhan Monat Guest

    Its usually better to use a PIC with the ADC built in.
     
  4. Provided the internal ADC is up to the required
    specifications. Though not that bad, it is limited.

    Rene
     
  5. hamilton

    hamilton Guest

    You better check your ADCs, serial, SPI type are faster that parallel
    types. Those used in DSP applications are all serial(SPI) type.
     
  6. Mac

    Mac Guest

    You better check your ADCs, serial, SPI type are faster that parallel
    types. Those used in DSP applications are all serial(SPI) type.[/QUOTE]

    If SPI can keep up with the ADC output, then the ADC is not fast, in my
    book.

    I don't know what problem domain you are used to working in, but all the
    fast ADC's I am familiar with are parallel. It wouldn't be all that
    practical, in my opinion, to do a 14-bit 100 MHz ADC as a serial part, and
    of course it would be impossible for SPI.

    --Mac
     
  7. I want to interface my PIC uC with external ADC, I want to know which
    If one were better than the other on all aspects only one type would
    be sold.

    Note that there are aslo lots of serial variations (SPI, ICC, I2C,
    1-wire, etc)


    Wouter van Ooijen

    -- ------------------------------------
    http://www.voti.nl
    Webshop for PICs and other electronics
    http://www.voti.nl/hvu
    Teacher electronics and informatics
     
  8. Chopper

    Chopper Guest

    Hi

    I have used a 11 I/P 8 bit serial ADC on a PIC 16F84 quite successfully.
    Serial uses less uC pins so you can the PIC for other things. I had mine
    driving a LCD & RS232 chip as well. The programming is slightly more
    difficult though as you have to program & count address pulses, clock pulses
    & read out the serial data. Parallel stuff works in bytes (or nybbles) which
    are usually easier to program

    Hope this helps & not too late,

    Chopper

    Remove 'Chopper' from email address
     
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