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selecting motor

Discussion in 'Sensors and Actuators' started by wiki, Feb 19, 2013.

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  1. wiki

    wiki

    4
    0
    Sep 28, 2012
    Hi,
    i am making a robot which would be having a weight of not more than 10Kg.it is a four wheeled robot with chained differential drive and has two motors in all.i want it to have a good speed and a good torque.can any one tell me which motor will be best for it,and y that motor is best??
     

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  2. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    Since no one else is answering, I will try.

    The problem with your post is that it is so vague that it cannot be answered.

    What is good speed? This might mean anything from walking speed to 100K/hr.

    What is good torque? At what RPM? Did you know that you can increase torque by decreasing RPM (known also as gearing?)

    And most of all, what is best? After you have specified all the relevant parameters, i.e. power, RPM torque, voltage and current, size constaints, etc. then best might still mean:

    Lowest cost
    Most efficient
    Highest power to weight ratio
    Most durable
    Smallest size
    Quietest

    Or any number of other things.

    So it is a little difficult to answer.

    But my here is my answer anyway: The best motor is the 225 slant six from the 1960 dodge dart.

    Bob
     
  3. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    You might want to look at small high speed motors and gear them down, you might be really amazed at what an 'pro grade' RC car/plane/helli motor can do when geared down...

    I know slang and modern definitions will differ, but that's an engine not a motor ;)

    With that said many of the straight sixes from that era (across manufactures) run forever, or a least a whole lot longer than other American steel engines...
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    C.C.

    Look up the definition of motor on the web. Most of the defs I found included internal combustion engine as an example of a motor. I think motor is the more general term.

    Boib
     
  5. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Maybe you missed what I typed?

     
  6. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    No, I misinterpreted it. I thought you were saying that calling it a motor was slang, and a modern defintiion of motor would not include an internal combustion engine.

    Bob
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2013
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Gotcha, just one of those things of mine, had a mechanic in the family growing up and he was a stickler that an internal combustion engine was not a motor, and although I know that modern definitions disagree I can see his point still to this day...
     
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