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Schematic For EL12 Turn Signal Flasher

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by CDRIVE, Oct 21, 2013.

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  1. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

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    May 8, 2012
    I just replaced the flasher module on my wife's 1989 Jeep wrangler. Yes, it's been in there since 1989 and 226000 miles. Auto Zone's replacement was an EL12, which is transparent. I could see that it was not a bimetal thermal element but rather electromagnetic, which included a 1600uF timing cap. I believe the original is thermal because it's much lighter and EM flashers weren't common in 1989.

    After installing it my curiosity was peeked because thermal elements are normally closed in their quiescent state. Initially I surmised that the EL12 is a N/C current relay with the contacts in series with the coil, though the coil winding AWG seemed to small to be a current relay; IE in series with the lamp load. Besides, a current relay would have a coil resistance so low as to make a 1600uF ineffective.

    I could remove it and examine it further but my old (sciatica + muscle spasms) back tells me that I survived being twisted like a pretzel once and an encore performance would not be wise. Heck, I hated being under the dashboard when I was 20!

    FYI: I searched my fingers raw but have not found a schematic of the EL12's guts. There may have been a resistor and diode in there that I may have missed. The case is smoked plastic, which makes it more translucent than transparent. I should also note that her jeep uses a separate flasher module for the emergency/hazard switch.

    So, is anyone familiar with the EL12?

    In the interim I'll be drawing some possibilities.

    Thanks,
    Chris
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  2. CDRIVE

    CDRIVE Hauling 10' pipe on a Trek Shift3

    4,960
    648
    May 8, 2012
    Now that I thought about it a bit more I'm fairly certain that there was a resistor in there too. This is what I think is in there because it simulates well. The actual wiring of the turn signal circuit is simplified here, as I don't show the brake switch override / interconnect. Tina also needs a C/O switch model!

    Chris
     

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