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SainSmart 5V 4 Channel Solid State Relay momentary switch

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by StealthRT, Mar 14, 2013.

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  1. StealthRT

    StealthRT

    133
    2
    Sep 4, 2010
    SainSmart 5V 4 Channel Relay momentary switch

    Hey all i am wanting to hook this relay up here:

    [​IMG]

    What i am wanting it to be hooked to (output) is the pwr and reset switch on a PC motherboard to act as a momentary switch:
    [​IMG]

    I am also wanting to hook one of those relays up to the 5v USB power so that i can turn off a usb product when i put the relay on high (which does not connect anything to the usb out).

    So i am thinking it would be hooked up like so:
    [​IMG]

    And here is the schematic:
    [​IMG]

    Let me know if this is correct! Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2013
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    You would probably be better off with a relay board rather than using SSRs for this.

    Depending on the internal design of the SSR, there may be a voltage drop across them, or they may require a minimum voltage to operate.

    If not, the way you have wired them up looks correct.
     
  3. StealthRT

    StealthRT

    133
    2
    Sep 4, 2010
    But it looks like it only AC for the output?
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yes, and the application is to switch low voltage DC -- hence the problem.

    It is possible (although not certain) that the output is a triac. If it were, and the current available was high enough, the output would latch on.

    It is also possible that if the switching was designed with zero crossing detection that the voltage would never get low enough for it to enable the switching (although 5V is likely to be low enough).

    So there's more reasons.

    In this application, you can possibly get away with using an optocoupler rather than a relay or an SSD. Look for an optocoupler with a bipolar (preferably darlington) output. The other option is one with a logic level output, but this will require power from the computer (possibly the 5V standby rail).
     
  5. StealthRT

    StealthRT

    133
    2
    Sep 4, 2010
    I have gone ahead and updated my OP with a new relay board and an additional question.

    [edit: I wish people wouldn't do that. It destroys the flow of information in the thread I have placed your new idea here below]

    Hey all i am wanting to hook this relay up here:
    [​IMG]

    What i am wanting it to be hooked to (output) is the pwr and reset switch on a PC motherboard to act as a momentary switch:
    [​IMG]

    I am also wanting to hook one of those relays up to the 5v USB power so that i can turn off a usb product when i put the relay on high (which does not connect anything to the usb out).

    So i am thinking it would be hooked up like so:
    [​IMG]

    And here is the schematic:
    [​IMG]

    Let me know if this is correct! Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 15, 2013
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,497
    2,838
    Jan 21, 2010
    Yes, that would work, but as I suggested, the optocouplers themselves may be sufficient. There is probably no need to purchase the relay board.

    Also, look around for a better price. The source you have quoted are nowhere near the cheapest for *exactly* the same part.

    edit: They're worse than I thought. Aim to pay a third or less of what they're asking.
     
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2013
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