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Safety relays, 24V

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by Jens Gydesen, Mar 11, 2007.

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  1. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    Hi,

    I am looking for safety relays for 24V activation, min 25A switch current

    You can easily find 24V relays for automotive, but they are obviously not
    approved for emergency stop function in an industrial application.

    Anyone here who knows 24V safety relays,

    Thanks,

    best regards Jens
     
  2. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Jens Gydesen"

    ** Huh ?????

    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&q=safety+relays+&btnG=Google+Search&meta=


    What troglodytes have never heard of Google ???




    ........ Phil
     
  3. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    Hi,

    Thank you for your kindly words, I suggest that you carry on with the
    googling,
    perhaps you have more luck than me, I have tried a couple of hours,

    Please notice that the contact shall be min 25A

    /JG
     
  4. Elesta specialise in force-guided relays.
    <http://www.elestarelays.com>

    Unfortunately they probably only go up to the
    8-16A region. Is there any way you can split
    the 25A load?
     
  5. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    No, I cannot split the current, it is one DC motor that shall be stopped

    /jg
     
  6. scada

    scada Guest

    With that current you should be looking for a contactor. You did not mention
    if you are switching AC or DC. If DC you can look for contactors with
    "magnetic blow out arc chutes". Look for industrial contactors from oem's
    such as Square D. Try your local electrical supply house.
     
  7. Use a contactor and strap the contacts together - use the in out method.

    24 V coils are available.
     
  8. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Jens Gydesen"


    ** Now he is a top poster as well as a troglodyte !


    ** Was that before or after you came here?

    Always say if you have Google and under what search headings.

    You would not want to waste good folk's time, now would you ?



    ** That likely calls for a remote operated circuit breaker.

    Shame how you have left out the voltage rating.



    ......... Phil
     
  9. Phil Allison

    Phil Allison Guest

    "Jens Gydesen"

    ** What does one have to do to get this top posting cretin to say what the
    operating voltage of the load is ??





    ....... Phil
     
  10. Have him disconnect the power source, grab the motor (+) lead, and the
    operating voltage will be proportional to how loud he hollers until the
    motor finally coasts to a stop :)

    Paul
     
  11. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    A 24V DC motor with a current rating of 25A requires a special
    contactor capable of short delay on opening. Such contactors are made
    by Kilovac (Tyco).

    Here is a unit rated for 50A which would be worth looking at.
    http://relays.tycoelectronics.com/datasheets/ap50.pdf
     
  12. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    Hi Ross

    Thanks for the objective support

    Best regards Jens
     
  13. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    Hi scada

    Thanks for your objective support

    best regards Jens
     
  14. Jens Gydesen

    Jens Gydesen Guest

    Hi Homer

    Thanks for your objective support

    best regards Jens
     
  15. If the contacts are A B C

    The input wire goes to A, then B then C

    The output wire goes to C, then B then A

    This distributes the current almost equally across the contacts.
     
  16. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    And thank you Jens for your courtesy in responding individually to
    those who have tried to offer positive assistance. Such is not always
    the case in these forums and it is not unknown for an OP to never even
    respond to a thread despite many positive replies. When that happens I
    just shrug my shoulders......
     
  17. For inductive and regenerative DC loads, such as a motor, contacts are
    often wired in series to provide greater arcing distance. In order to stop
    a DC motor quickly and safely, it may be useful to apply a heavy load, or
    even a short circuit, to the motor, which will also eliminate possible high
    voltage arcing. A snubber or capacitor can be used to reduce the voltage
    kick during the time between the opening of the supply contactor and the
    closing of the braking contactor.

    Paul
     
  18. OR:

    The KBBC-24M is a microprocessor controlled, DC-DC battery powered variable
    speed motor control designed for 12 and 24vdc Permanent Magnet and Series
    Wound DC motors. It has a continuous rating of 40 amps and is capable of
    peak currents of 80 amps for 7 seconds. The KBBC-24M low voltage DC Drive
    contains many standard features such as current limit, short circuit
    protection, speed potentiometer fault detector, over-temperature sensing,
    and under-voltage/over-voltage protection. Eight trimpots are provided to
    tailor the low voltage DC-DC Drive to exact specifications. Reversing
    contactors provide arcless forward, stop and reverse operation. A DC power
    contactor allows a low power switch to turn the control on and off. See data
    sheet D-905 for complete details.

    The KBBC-44M is a microprocessor controlled DC-DC battery powered variable
    speed motor control designed for 12, 24, 36 and 48vdc Permanent Magnet and
    Series Wound DC motors. It has a continuous rating of 40 amps and is capable
    of peak currents of 80 amps for 7 seconds. The KBBC-24M low voltage DC-DC
    Drive contains many standard features such as current limit, short circuit
    protection, speed potentiometer fault detector, over-temperature sensing,
    and under-voltage/over-voltage protection. Eight trimpots are provided to
    tailor the low voltage DC Drive to exact specifications. Reversing
    contactors provide arcless forward, stop and reverse operation. A DC power
    contactor allows a low power switch to turn the control on and off. See data
    sheet D-905 for complete details.


    http://www.kbelectronics.com
     
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