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safe to charge 7.2v with 9v source

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by kendelmar, Jul 4, 2013.

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  1. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    My camera battery which is a Panasonic dmw-blc12PP battery. The specs on the front are:
    7.2v 1200mAh 8.7Wh Li-ion.

    I have a couple of other batteries that work with my camera and the mAh varies including a 3000mAh.

    We are going to be traveling to the Amazon and electricity will be scarce and I don't want to be shut down from taking pictures because of lack of power.

    I have found two products from Anker that carry 14400mAh and 20000mAh respectively. They both charge at 9V. Anker said I should check with Panasonic - which was a joke and yielded no answer.

    I can find no information on the internet...thus, I am here at this site.

    Do any experts out there have any advice for me?

    I can purchase and take extra camera batteries but I'm concerned that they will simply drain out over two weeks time. And the Anker product would definitely be good for charging other things.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    What are you asking?

    Do you want to know if the Ankler batteries can be fitted to the camera?

    Or if the Ankler charger can charge the Panasonic battery?

    Or if the Anker battery can recharge the Panasonic battery?

    For the first 2 questions, the first question I would have is "Do they fit?"

    If it is the last question, then the answer is probably "No", but with some knowledge and (possibly) fanct electronics you might be able to work something out.

    How long before you go to the Amazon?

    Do the batteries really discharge in a week? They shouldn't if you're not using them.

    If there's sun at this time of the year where you're going then I might consider a solar charger. But that might be large and/or cumbersome to cart around.
     
  3. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    To clarify further:

    I have a panasonic battery and a charger. The anker external battery would plug into the charger. The panasonic battery is 7.2V. Anker is, as I understand it, charging at 9V. The Anker rep did not know if this would harm my Panasonic 7.2V battery. They all fit together - the question is whether it is safe for the battery I want to charge.

    The added benefit of the external Aker battery pack is the ability to charge other devices.

    I haven't actually tested how long the batteries will stay fully charged.

    We are very limited to the amount of stuff we can take into the Amazon Research Center so I don't know about a solar charger. I could look into that. We are going 8 hours by small boat. Gotta try to travel light.
     
  4. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    You haven't actually answered my questions.

    *Does* the anklerbattery plug into the panasonic charger (as in, is it a "compatible" battery that can be charged from the panasonic charger and then used in the panasonic camera?) or is it something different?

    Perhaps you can post a link to a web site that describes the ankler battery and another that describes the panasonic camera?
     
  5. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    http://www.amazon.com/Wasabi-Power-...F8&qid=1372960207&sr=1-3&keywords=dmw-blc12pp

    http://www.amazon.com/Upgraded-Anke...d=1372984923&sr=1-3&keywords=anker+astro+pro2

    Above are the links to the two devices..

    The wasabi battery charger has a pin that is intended for use with a car charger..

    The anker external battery pack has a pin that fits the battery charger.

    So the anker external battery would be hooked to the wasabi battery charger that would hold the 7.2v camera battery.. That anker external battery would be a 9v. Is this arrangement going to damage the camera battery which is 7.2v?
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Aha! Now I see.

    The Anker battery says it has a 12V 2A output.

    I would connect the 12V charger to a 12V power source and place a flat battery in the charge whilst measuring the current. If it is 2A or less, then the Anker battery should be fine.

    I would try using it to charge a couple of batteries before you go so that you know how many charges you'll get and that it's definitely going to work.

    If you have access to a bench power supply that will make the initial testing of the charger easier.
     
  7. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    The anker is both 9v and 12v. There is switch to select which to use.
    I would connect the 12V charger to a 12V power source and place a flat battery in the charge whilst measuring the current. If it is 2A or less, then the Anker battery should be fine. Sorr
    Sorry but I have no idea what you are suggesting. I don't have access to a bench tester thingy. I am a total idiot when it comes to power.
    This all seems much too complicated. I was drawn to the anker because it specifically said it could charge camera batteries. Ugh
     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    1) go out and purchase a cheap multimeter -- it should cost you less than $20. It needs to have a 10A current range.

    2) charge up the anker battery.

    3) set the anker battery to 12V

    4) connect the -ve lead from the anker battery to the negative input of your camera battery charger.

    5) switch the meter to the 10A current range and plug the meter leads into the correct location.

    6) connect the read meter lead to the +ve output of the anker battery.

    7) connect the black lead of the multimeter to the +ve input of the camera battery charger.

    The meter should read zero or some very low value (0.01 perhaps). Check to make sure the anker battery is turned on!

    8) insert a flat camera battery into the charger.

    The reading on the meter will rise. Anything below 2.00 is OK. If there is a second or so when it exceeds 2.00 then that's probably OK too.

    Tell us the current it settles to and we can tell you about how long the anker battery will last.

    I'm not sure of the exact connections, so finding the +ve and -ve inputs and outputs may not be obvious.

    Unless you're sure, don't plug anything in because plugging things in backwards can cause damage.
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Actually, if you can tell us the rating of the camera battery you're charging in mAh (it should be printed on the battery) then we may be able to come up with a quick estimate of the charging current.

    If you know how long it takes to charge from dead flat, that will be quite useful too.
     
  10. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    Hello again
    I have 1200 1400 and 3000 mAh batteries
    Realizing that I know nothing, it still seems quite confusing to me that the 1400mAh batteries came with a charger that will plug into the wall AND charge via cigarette light adapter that appears to usually be 12v from what I can tell on ads. So if 12v is okay. Why wouldn't 9v be okay?
     
  11. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
    Oh and I have no idea whatsoever how long they take to charge....

    Thank you for your interest.
     
  12. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Because they're designed for 12V.

    7.2V is close enough to 9V that there may be insufficient overhead to charge the battery correctly. Also, 7.2 represents the nominal battery voltage, not the peak when charging.

    If it requires 12 and you can provide 12, then use 12.
     
  13. NuLED

    NuLED

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    Jan 7, 2012
    When you are RECHARGING a battery, what you are trying to do is "force" electricity back into the battery.

    In the description that Steve gave you, notice that you put the negative of the charger to the negative of the battery. And the +ve to the +ve. In this manner, you are trying to push AGAINST the battery's normal electricity flow.

    What you need to do to recharge batteries (that are designed to be rechargeable) is to use MORE ELECTRICAL FORCE to push into the battery, and "undo" the battery chemistry inside (the same chemistry that, when it reacts, produces electricity until it is used up).

    You need a sufficiently HIGHER VOLTAGE than the battery's own voltage so you have enough "strength" to "undo" the battery chemistry.

    This is what Steve means when he said that 9V might not be "strong enough" to push against the 7V, and this is why the manufacturer is providing you 12V and also the wall socket (which may be 12V or even higher, but probably is 12V. It will have some mechanism to convert the 120V or 220V into a much lower voltage.).

    So, 9V is not a sure thing.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2013
  14. NuLED

    NuLED

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    Jan 7, 2012
    If your mission at the research center is important enough, I think it might warrant you ALSO bringing along a solar panel charger as well. Some of them are quite light. But also of course you really need STRONG SUNLIGHT not just weak overcast sunlight. If you can find one producing 12V (and especially if it has a female automobile cigarette connector) that might work with your charger(s) if they have a male 12V adaptor to plug into cars.

    I have a lightweight panel by GoalZero but I don't necessarily recommend that brand (I have had a lot of trouble with their batteries, but the solar panel seems OK). Not much bulkier than a large paperback book. Shop around.
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    If the charger is designed to charge 1200mAh batteries, then it probably charges at under 2A. I think it's worth trying.
     
  16. kendelmar

    kendelmar

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    Jul 4, 2013
  17. NuLED

    NuLED

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    Jan 7, 2012
    Quite possibly better than the 9V option.

    I don't REALLY know how these work (the products you listed) but I'd say if there was a 12V outlet, and you have a 12V charger input, it should work. Of course, there is going to be some efficiency loss, because you are sending it through two kinds of battery mechanisms, so you mileage may be (must be) less than the theoretical. Again, as I said, I don't know how "mission critical" is your trip, but if it were me, I would have a secondary or even tertiary alternative power solution (solar, etc.) if you MUST be able to capture footage for your research.
     
  18. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    You need 12V. So the one with switchable 9V and 12V output is equivalent to one providing 12V and 14V (assuming I understand the specs).

    You need 12V.

    A 4A output will mean there is less chance of overloading it. If it has a higher capacity then you gain from that too.
     
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