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ROHS directive and electric vehicles?

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by conundrum, Jul 25, 2006.

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  1. conundrum

    conundrum Guest

    Hi all.

    Seems that the EU have again shot themselves in the foot by totally
    banning NiCad batteries, as it seems that the recycling of old
    batteries into the electric vehicle (EV) market is not allowed.

    This effectively means that LiIon is the only acceptable choice, and
    given the lack of a certified pack design for automotive use means that
    they have effectively outlawed electric vehicles for the forseeable
    future.

    So the next time you fill up at the pump and see the ridiculous price
    of petrol, you can blame the idiots in Brussels :(

    -A
     
  2. Guest

    Wait until we get the RoHP, Regulation on Harmful Politicians :)
     
  3. Guest

    Wait until we get the RoHP, Regulation on Harmful Politicians :)

    Otoh, I have seen at least three solutions to that bind hydrogen to a
    metalpowder or bricks. Which will release it with a small heater.
     
  4. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    I don't think anyone was using Nicad anyway. Li-ion seems to be the way since
    only it appears to be remotely capable of the energy density needed.

    Fuel cells are the alternative.

    Graham
     
  5. none

    none Guest

    maybe you havn't moticed the trends with supercaps?
    150 Farads!?!?

    dan
     
  6. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    Hydrides are monumentally heaver than the hydrogen itself though.

    Graham
     
  7. What is the leakage current?
     
  8. rue_mohr

    rue_mohr Guest

    I think its quite low, they are being used as backup cells for low power
    circuits.

    hmm, I wish I could...
    ah here is my old elna catalog...
    2.5V 100F hmm its not clear, looks like 30uA

    "Panasonic's GoldCaps comprise several ranges of pc-board-mounting
    capacitors with values of 0.1 to 2F at 2.3 or 5.5V, targeting a variety
    of data-retention and -backup functions.
    The company recently added the Ultra-Power (UP-Cap) device, which it
    aims at emerging 42V automotive applications. It specifies these
    devices, which come in cylindrical-can format, at 500 to 2500F and 2.3V
    and claims a lifetime of 2000 hours at 2.3V and 60°C. Panasonic's
    automotive-device-marketing specialist Matthias Frey, describing the use
    of an array of 40 to 50 capacitors in a vehicle, anticipates that the
    technology will reach the full 75°C rating that the automotive industry
    would like to have by 2005 or 2006. Panasonic is currently building
    capacitor arrays to explore automotive applications as special custom
    projects.
    "

    http://www.edn.com/index.asp?layout=article&articleid=CA268379


    see, I'm not off my rocker!
    2500F thats just crazy


    dan
     
  9. RHRRC

    RHRRC Guest

    If you actually take the bother to read the agreed text of the
    EU battery directive you will learn that it does *not* advocate
    "totally banning NiCad batteries".

    It does, however, seek to reduce the impact all battery types have on
    the environment by a number of strategies.

    In particular the use of NiCad batteries is well recognised in the
    directive for duties where their properties remain unequalled in
    performance at economical levels in the marketplace.
     
  10. RHRRC

    RHRRC Guest

    If you actually take the bother to read the agreed text of the
    EU battery directive you will learn that it does *not* advocate
    "totally banning NiCad batteries".

    It does, however, seek to reduce the impact all battery types have on
    the environment by a number of strategies.

    In particular the use of NiCad batteries is well recognised in the
    directive for duties where their properties remain unequalled in
    performance at economical levels in the marketplace.
     
  11. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    In a similar manner, neither are lead acid batteries banned.

    Graham
     
  12. Mark

    Mark Guest

    I wonder about the law of unintended consequences with this ROHS stuff.
    How much extra pollution will be cuased by all the extra paper and
    work needed to support extra part numbers. How many people will be
    killed or injured by failed vehicle equipment with bad solder joints
    due to non-lead solder or due to the growth of whiskers. How much
    extra trash will be created by all the electronic gear that fails due
    to these problems. Its a classic case of letting beauracrats get in
    the way of common sense.

    Mark
     
  13. CWatters

    CWatters Guest

    NiMH cells are just about as good as NiCad these days. The model car/plane
    boys have all switched over. NiMH cells can supply quite high current.
     
  14. CWatters

    CWatters Guest

    It's very hard to build a decent EV using NiCad, NiMH or Lead cells anyway.
    Li cells are better and getting better. They just aren't available in
    quantity yet....

    http://www.lithiumtech.com/StandardCells.html
    http://www.a123systems.com/html/home.html
    http://www.valence.com
     
  15. ian field

    ian field Guest

    Europe has mad politician disease!!!
     
  16. Eeyore

    Eeyore Guest

    It's hard to disagree with that assessment for sure !

    Graham
     
  17. What country (or coalition, or whatever) doesn't?

    Thanks,
    Rich
     
  18. CWatters

    CWatters Guest

    Probably all the cadmium in the drinking water.
     
  19. ian field

    ian field Guest

    Cadmium doesn't cause mad politician disease (more likely mercury!) and Cd
    is more likely to turn up in tobacco than drinking water!
     
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