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Revive Gel Battery?

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by KenO, Nov 30, 2012.

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  1. KenO

    KenO Guest

    Inherited an Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) that was unused for a while so the gel battery is fully discharged.

    Do not want to purchase a new gel battery so am interested in trying to revive it.

    Did a search and found Battery Life Saver Patent #7374839
    http://batterylifesaver.com/how-do-i-revive-a-dead-battery/
    Patent PDF http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7374839.pdf

    found discussion of Battery Life Saver
    http://www.rvforum.net/SMF_forum/index.php?topic=22055.0

    Am interested in any experience others have had in reviving gel batteries either using Battery Life Saver or any other technique.


    Ken
     
  2. mike

    mike Guest

    I built a computer controlled charger/discharger. And I have a pulse
    generator
    that can put out an amp or 50V. I've done considerable experimentation with
    recovering many different battery technologies.

    Bottom line: Give it up.

    While I believe that a pulse charger/desulfator can help prevent
    deterioration on a good battery that's rarely used...boat...RV,

    Once the battery has been dead for a long time, it ain't coming back.

    A UPS is one of the most stressful applications for a battery.
    A tiny amount of series resistance will render it useless in that
    application.

    My UPS battery isn't completely dead, but it can keep my system up
    for 15 seconds or so.
    Since the typical outage is less than a second, it's not worth replacing
    the battery. Outages longer than a second are likely to be longer than
    any ups can handle. But might give you a chance to shut down the system
    gracefully.

    For most of us, a UPS is overrated. If you really need it, spring for
    a new battery.
    If not, send it to recycle.
     
  3. KenO

    KenO Guest

    Mike,

    Thanks for your comments. Since posting have been reading reviving battery posts on other forums and most are similar to yours.

    Ken
     
  4. KenO

    KenO Guest

    Mike,

    "I've done considerable experimentation with recovering many different battery technologies....While I believe that a pulse charger/desulfator can help prevent
    deterioration on a good battery that's rarely used...boat...RV,Once the battery has been dead for a long time, it ain't coming back..."

    Have you posted your experiments?

    Am especially interested in "pulse charger/desulfator can help prevent
    deterioration on a good battery that's rarely used"

    Thanks again for your comments!

    Ken
     
  5. Bob F

    Bob F Guest

    I'd search for a source of re-cycled used batteries. Many users recycle them
    after some # of years, and the batteries are still usable in many cases. I've
    goten several usable ones at a local metal recycle center that happens to be
    good about selling cheap batteries they've taken in.
     
  6. mike

    mike Guest

    There's lots written on the subject, mostly by people who want to sell
    you something. I don't think there's any consensus on what works.
    The consensus seems to be that none of them work.
    I don't understand the chemistry, but it appears that the sulphate forms
    an insulating layer on the plate surface. Once it's there, it's hard to get
    removed.
    But if you don't let it form, it's not a problem. Pulse charging gives you
    that peak current to keep the thing charged without boiling away the
    electrolyte.
     
  7. mike

    mike Guest

    Hospitals are required to change batteries in life-saving equipment on a
    regular schedule. That seeks to make sure the stuff works when it's needed.
    People who work for hospitals take them out of the dumpster and to
    swapmeets.
    I've NEVER bought one that was worth a damn.
    For low drain apps, maybe they work ok. For high drain apps
    like a UPS, they've been universally unsuitable.

    You might have better luck if you get closer to the source.
    By the time they get to a swapmeet, they've been cherry-picked
    multiple times.

    If you've got a standard 7AH 12V battery, just go spend $20 and be
    done with it. It's not worth the hassle.
    But do buy one from a high volume dealer. One that's been sittin'
    on the shelf for two years is not what you want.
    And if you buy off EBAY, you never know what you'll get.
     
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