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reverse polarity relay??

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by OZEXPAT, May 5, 2013.

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  1. OZEXPAT

    OZEXPAT

    3
    0
    May 5, 2013
    I am not anything remotely close to an electronics expert and am seeking help

    I want to find a polarity reversing relay to control a linear actuator on a timer

    I found a wiring diagram on line

    [​IMG]

    It is described as a DPDT switch internally wired for polarity-reversal applications: only four rather than six wires are brought outside the switch housing

    where can I find something like this - i am unsure by descriptions if I am looking for the right thing
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    You have the description, it's a DPDT (Double Pole - Double Throw) switch or relay... You can find them all over the place, try Google, Ebay or your local/Internet electronic component store...
     
  3. OZEXPAT

    OZEXPAT

    3
    0
    May 5, 2013
    I have seen DPDT but none set up internally for polarity switching. Can I do this outside the relay?
     
  4. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    Yes, the way you connect the wires produces the desired result...
     
  5. OZEXPAT

    OZEXPAT

    3
    0
    May 5, 2013
    thank you.

    The comment that its set up internally threw me - I can do this!ou

    thank y
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,361
    2,756
    Jan 21, 2010
    May not be useful, but...

    In addition, you'll often see exactly the same wiring, but with each set of contacts on a different relay (i.e. two SPDT relays). This allows a motor to got forward, backward, or stop.

    Normally the relays are wired to that when neither is powered, the motor is off.
     
  7. Six_Shooter

    Six_Shooter

    98
    0
    Nov 16, 2012
    As suggested two SPDT relays can be used.

    Look up the wiring used to control door lock actuators in a vehicle. You will notice that when done this way that only one actuator is energized at a time, due to the at rest polarity of the system.
     
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