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Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by icor1031, Dec 14, 2013.

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  1. icor1031

    icor1031

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    Apr 27, 2010
    Where should I look, to learn a decent amount about home wiring? I have an electronics book, which I still need to read.. But, are there other sources I should read from, too? (which ones?)

    After my thread here was closed, I posted on other forums. I've come to the conclusion that I'm probably not going to get a reliable answer. Professional electricians give me contrary information, even ones that mention the NEC.

    And thus, learning it myself from pro resources is the only way I'm going to learn.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    Your original thread was closed because you're a danger to yourself and potentially others.

    Get a higher powered circuit fitted, and even then, the long extension cord (which may not be legal) will need to be very heavy cable to ensure your voltage doesn't droop.
     
  3. icor1031

    icor1031

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    Apr 27, 2010
    I'm in shock.. I'm being scolded even when I ask for pro resources to learn the right way of doing things.. Every one starts off knowing nothing.

     
  4. duke37

    duke37

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    Jan 9, 2011
    You do not say what country you are in. The systems and regulations differ significantly, voltages, earthing, current limit, cable sizes, protection systems etc.

    In the UK you can go to the local library and borrow a copy of the current ! regulations. The law here allows non professionals to make small changes such as replacing a light switch. Anything bigger and the work has to be signed off by a qualified electrician.
     

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  5. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt

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    4
    Nov 12, 2013
    In the USA, all states follow the NEC, but who can do what varies. In many locales, an individual can do his entire house wiring, if it is inspected. A professional electrician also requires inspection, but such inspections of work done by professionals is often lacking. Buildings classified as commercial are a completely different story, regardless of who owns it and its actual use. Farms are another story.

    In short, if you want good advice, tell us where you are and what are you planning to do. Sorry, I don't recall the other thread, if that information was there.

    John
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    And the law here technically doesn't allow you to do anything beyond changing a lightbulb!
     
  7. icor1031

    icor1031

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    Apr 27, 2010
    I am in SD, USA. And average guys can do the wiring, but it has to be inspected - I saw that in the state's homeowner wiring handbook.

     
  8. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Jan 21, 2010
    In that case, post #2 gives you what is almost certainly the correct answer.
     
  9. icor1031

    icor1031

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    Apr 27, 2010
    Thanks, Steve.



    I have more questions than I asked here, which were raised by other forum posts.


    I'm intentionally leaving out the details, as I'd prefer to learn from books.
    I searched for and/or asked about points 2 and 3, but professionals gave contrary info. That's why I prefer to learn from books.

    I need to know things, such as:


    • Is it legal to use an extension cord to power receptacles? And what determines the minimum gauge (Again, according to the law.)
    • What must the receptacle's amp rating be, in relation to the breaker - or if it matters.
    • When using 220v 2-phase line to power a pair of 110v 1-phase circuits, does the neutral see the sum or the difference?
    • Does wire location matter, in relation to faced insulation?
    etc.


    I think this is what I need: An understanding of basic electricity (which I can learn from my electronics book). An NEC guide, and a state wiring guide.

    Am I missing anything?
    Of course, an electrician will have to inspect it - but I'd like to get it right for the first time he comes.


    http://www.amazon.com/Illustrated-Guide-National-Electrical-Code/dp/1435498135/ref=tmm_pap_title_0



     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013
  10. jcurrie

    jcurrie

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    Feb 22, 2011
    first off get a 50 amp 220- braker and install it in main box , then get a #8 3 wire under ground rated cable with ground then install a sub box in shed then wire from there, what you are trying to do cheep will either fry some one or burn somthing down. as for a book get a copy of uglys electrical manual.
    jcurrie
     
  11. icor1031

    icor1031

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    0
    Apr 27, 2010
    What part would fry someone?

     
  12. jcurrie

    jcurrie

    128
    1
    Feb 22, 2011
    running 220 to socket and splitting it into 2 110 outlets, which sound good but if A the cords are not wired correct you might end up with 220 potiantal between what ever is pluged in to them B in most states its outlawed to run two voltages in same box( outlet or run) , have seen 5 fatal short cuts use in my time and coutless flash burns fingers fried ect ect , electution often only gives you one chance most of the time so saving a few bucks an't worth it.
    jcurrie.
     
  13. icor1031

    icor1031

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    0
    Apr 27, 2010
    Thanks, mate.

     
  14. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,598
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    Sep 5, 2009
    your incompetence in working with mains voltages!!


    If you want to learn properly, enrol for a electricians course at your local technical college


    thread closed yet again
    DONT start another on this subject!!

    Dave
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2013
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