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resistor value

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by protech, Feb 13, 2011.

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  1. protech

    protech

    6
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    Hi

    Could anyone advise on the value this resisitor?

    It looks like it has failed as it is open circuit when testing
    it so I can not measure it's resisitance and i do not have any
    access to the circuit diagram.

    http://www.earthspike.com/jv.jpg

    The colours, which look fadded, seem to be:

    WHITE : BROWN : BROWN : RED : SILVER

    or it could be

    WHITE : ORANGE : ORANGE : RED : SILVER

    any ideas on what value it is so I can replace it?

    also does the colour of the resistor body (blue/green) have any significance?

    Cheers
     
  2. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    White brown is a standard value, not white orange, but it could be a special fuse resistor. Is the symbol on the PCB different from the others? What's the circuit it's in?
     
  3. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,489
    2,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    Silver on the end of a resistor implies 10% tolerance. That's something that you'd be very unlikely to see these days. It's also not a code for a temperature coefficient (which is pretty rarely seen).

    The same goes for white, so it's not easily recognised as a resistor colour code.

    However, it matches the colour code for an inductor.

    See here. 3300uH

    One would suspect that such a high inductance in so small a package would equate to very fine windings and some sensitivity to overcurrent.
     
  4. protech

    protech

    6
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    Hi Guys,

    I did wonder if it is actually a resistor? I believe it is in line with the supply to the backlight of an 2x24 LCD display. The LCD display does not light up and i think this component is the reason.If i measure across it i get open circuit so i figure it may have failed?

    Is there anyway the be sure if it is an inductor or resistor?

    Cheers

    PT
     
  5. protech

    protech

    6
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    PS - yes the symbol on the board below it looks like a line with a curved line each side. Not a symbol I am familiar with. You can see it on the picture on the link. Looks a bit like:

    )|(

    Any ideas on what that symbol is btw?
     
  6. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Again; what does the PCB label say, and is the symbol on the PCB different from any other resistor symbols you can see there?
     
  7. protech

    protech

    6
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    The symbol is unique. no other components have that symbol. research shows it could be a 0.2ohm resistor designed to act as a fuse. it's part of the circuit that drives the backlight
    of a rackmount synthesiser
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,808
    1,943
    Sep 5, 2009
    just to throw a spanner in the works ....

    you may be reading the colour code back to front
    I would suggest that that may not be silver but rather grey and the white is the tolerance
    GY RD BN BN WH
    so you actually have a 820 Ohm resistor and yes it does look like the fuseable variety

    for what its worth ;)

    Dave
     
  9. Resqueline

    Resqueline

    2,848
    2
    Jul 31, 2009
    Ok, so the other resistors (if there's any) has other symbols (whatever they look like). And once again; what does the PCB label for that component say? R or F or what?
    You have already posted a picture of the part, now can you please post pictures of the whole PCB, one from straight above - and one from straight below (bottom)?
     
  10. protech

    protech

    6
    0
    Oct 2, 2010
    Thanks for the tip dave!

    Resqueline:

    There are no other resistors like that - all others are surface mount.
    There are no other symbols that are unrecognised except the one under the component as shown.
    There is no pcb label for the component.

    The initial question i asked was "Could anyone advise on the value this resisitor?" I thought it would be simple to identifiy the value?

    Cheeers

    Pt
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,489
    2,830
    Jan 21, 2010
    You first have to determine if it is actually a resistor.

    As I noted above, the markings correspond exactly to a particular type of inductor. (but maybe it's not an inductor either)
     
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