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Resistor inside a fuse?

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Saucey, Oct 16, 2015.

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  1. Saucey

    Saucey

    2
    0
    Oct 16, 2015
    Ok Gurus I am stumped.

    I am an amateur at best but usually can track down a decent answer to my electronics questions/part replacement needs.
    This part has me stumped.

    It is a Glass Cartridge Fuse with a resistor inside of it. It came out of an Home Audio Receiver. It appears the resistor is soldered to the inside of the end caps of the fuse. One side is blown (solder burned though). There are 5 bands on the resistor. I am always terrible at reading resistor bands (color blind).
    Its ratings are 63mA 250V

    Any advice on replacement would be appreciated.
     
  2. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    3,121
    1,315
    Aug 21, 2015
    Sir Saucey . . . .






    [​IMG]


    Not abnormal at all to see that "delicate" type of fuse in some situations, its use of a selected resistor and using woods metal as the "solder"medium and letting resistor heat open it up.
    This case is using a 12 ohm resistor, and you see the pristine resistor, yet its break away due to the left coiled springs pull.
    Get a qualified family member to read and the pass on the series of color bands to us.(Unless color blinding is genetically engrained )
    An estimation of 63 ma @ a full 250 voltage level for just a resistor would be approx 4K but MANY other factors in over rating or derating from that being a specific value, because they don't do it that way.
    Belfuse shows using an approximate 29 ohm resistor inside of some of their fuses for that current/voltage application.
    Get us the colors.
    Also the brand logo if on the cap . . .my example is an "over the waters" brand.
    63 ma is a common instrument value and its type is of a slow/delay interrupt.


    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2015
  3. Martaine2005

    Martaine2005

    3,555
    966
    May 12, 2015
    Hi Saucey,
    63ma at 250v is approx 3.9K
    At 220v it is apprx 3.5K.

    Oops, Edd replied too..

    Martin
     
  4. Saucey

    Saucey

    2
    0
    Oct 16, 2015
    This is what it looks like. Thanks for the input!

    IMG_20151016_163053.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 17, 2015
  5. dorke

    dorke

    2,342
    665
    Jun 20, 2015
    Saucey,
    That is just a time-lag (slow blow fuse).
    Look at the markings "63mA 250V"
    There should be a "T" or "TT" mark left to 63.
     
  6. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

    3,121
    1,315
    Aug 21, 2015
    Parrallax + reflections yields a ? 91?? 81??11??10?? value.

    So just break off the left end cap and take an ohmmic reading, just for satisfying curiosity , as its being a metal film resistor and had only reached approx 160 deg F to trip.
    ( "spell check" . . . . . it don't knose "ohmmic" . . . . . eithers.

    Considering a like thermal delay, and If my turkey to baste ,I would just be using this Bel fuse family item.


    http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?mpart=3SB 62-R&vendor=507



    73's de Edd
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2015
  7. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,166
    726
    Aug 11, 2014
    I wonder why it just doesn't have a coiled element like other time delay fuses?

    I can't make out the colors either. Looks like a gold band where it don't belong.

    I'm with 73 de Edd,... take a hammer to it and take a reading.
     
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,866
    1,958
    Sep 5, 2009
    that looks ok

    brn rd (bk?) gold

    12 Ohms 5%
    looks like a black but am not 100 %
    as others said break and measure
     
  9. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,166
    726
    Aug 11, 2014
    No Dave, the picture in post 4
     
    davenn likes this.
  10. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,866
    1,958
    Sep 5, 2009
    crap .... didn't see the thumbnail wish ppl would do full size as well :rolleyes::oops:
    I will sort that out ;)
     
  11. Tha fios agaibh

    Tha fios agaibh

    2,166
    726
    Aug 11, 2014
    White, black, yellow, gold, brown?
    90.4 ohm 1%?
     
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