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Resistor & Capacitor Identification

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Nathan Older, Aug 23, 2014.

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  1. Nathan Older

    Nathan Older

    2
    0
    Aug 23, 2014
    Hi guys, I have recently taken on the task of repairing a friends Tv, It would appear that a resister and a couple of capacitors have died.

    I took the 3 items to a local Maplin store, and 3 guys there couldnt help me identify the parts. Im wondering if anyone here could help. I hope the pics are clear enough for you to help.

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards Nathan
     

    Attached Files:

  2. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

    690
    25
    Oct 2, 2011
    The first one is a 1500 pF safety capacitor
    The second one is a 2200 pF safety capacitor
    The third one is (probably) a 27.5Ω resistor. Probably because the fifth black band is no standard. Do you check it with a multimeter?

    i am almost ready to work at Maplin store ;)
     
  3. Nathan Older

    Nathan Older

    2
    0
    Aug 23, 2014
    If your reply is correct, you are already way above any maplin store employee

    Thanks so much
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

    7,682
    1,686
    Jan 5, 2010
    The first band is yellow, no? So 47.5

    Bob
     
    KrisBlueNZ likes this.
  5. OLIVE2222

    OLIVE2222

    690
    25
    Oct 2, 2011
    Sure you right ! thank you Bob for the correction !
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    I would measure the resistance of that "resistor"

    I have a feeling it might not have been a resistor.

    tw-inductor-color-code.jpg

    Black is a valid 4th band for inductors.

    A problem with this is that there are 5 bands, and it does not fit the pattern for a 5 band marking (If it has 5 bands, the first one should be silver).

    However, the device doesn't look like a resistor that has gotten hot. If it is open circuit this lends more weight to it being an inductor. Resistors (other than encapsulated wirewound types) tend to heat up and discolour before failure.
     
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