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require help in wave theory

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by programmer, Oct 18, 2014.

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  1. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    hi i need an answer.....my question is waves can transmit energy...can they be charged into positive or negative such that as they travel from one region to other they can attract or repel the opposite charge particles..........atlest a wave can move from one region of high potential to low potential.....plese i need a brief clarity among them to continue my project...and thanks for helping...
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Yes

    Yes

    No

    if they are charged

    yes

    brief enough?
     
  3. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    it mite have helped us to help you if we knew what sort of waves you were referring to
     
  4. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    speaking strictly i am speaking about electromagnetic waves sir.......or is there any sort of waves which can have some control on surrounding particles.....n thanks for helping me sir
     
  5. Laplace

    Laplace

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    Given the quantum mechanics principle of wave-particle duality, it might first be appropriate to consider when a wave is a particle, and when a particle is a wave. Much interesting reading can be had by searching for "electromagnetic wave particle interaction".
     
  6. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Ah, electromagnetic waves. Then you are talking about photons, and they are uncharged. So the answers become Yes, No, No, No, Yes.
     
  7. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    thanks for ur help sir......then is there any kind of waves such that they can be positively charged or negatively...........if not why cant......
     
  8. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    sir steve previously u said that waves can move from one region to other and can attract or repel the opposite charge particles if they are charged......how about that sir .......what abt that waves if iam not asking of electromagnetic waves......any wave thanks for helping
     
  9. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    As Steve mentioned a wave does not have any charge. The wave produces a force which acts upon other charged particles, the force can be repulsive or attractive. In metal conductors like what are used to connect circuits together the electric field is negative because the protons are bounded in the wires and can't move. But in the case of ice, the human body and electrolytes the flow of positive ions occur. This would produce a positive electric field. It's the charge that produces the electric field and not the other way around.
    I think that's right :)
    Adam
     
  10. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    Well, the waves could be electrons. They have charge. But you can't change that charge. so a beam of electrons could be attracted to a charge (i.e. they will respond to electric -- and indeed magnetic -- fields).

    Uncharged particles will respond to different fields. For example a beam of neutrons will respond to the strong nuclear force and gravity, whilst photons will respond to gravity.
     
  11. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    arouse sir......thanks for ur help .......
    u mentioned above that the wave produces a force which acts upon other charged particles, the force can be repulsive or attractive.....

    my idea is a wave can move from one region to other and it can attract and hold charged particles....

    by using this both can we use waves to transport...such that there will be a transmiter here and receiver at other end of a wave.....and the item we send is managed to be attracted and holded by the wave....it moves along the wave and reaches the destination............is this just possible or not sir.....if not why?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 23, 2014
  12. Laplace

    Laplace

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    If a physical particle were to be held by a wave, then the particle would travel at the same velocity as the wave. Can you see any problems with that concept? What is the energy required to propel a particle with mass to the speed of light? A wave can travel through material with some degree of mass density, but what happens if the particle collides with another particle of mass at the speed of light?
     
    Arouse1973 likes this.
  13. Gryd3

    Gryd3

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    There is truth in your response, but there is another way ;)
    Here is an example with sound waves. This does not rely on a charge to attract or repel objects, but could give you a little more info on how multiple waves could interact to move an object.


    I also think it's about time you explain what you are trying to accomplish. Usually general curiosity is taken care of by digging around and doing research. Questions usually arise when you try to apply what you have learned to a very specific idea or project that is not explicitly covered in any of the read material.
     
  14. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

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    Do you think a wave is like a metal wire that we can use to transport particles along to where we want them to go?
    Adam
     
  15. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    I can guess!

    Let me guess, you're trapped in a quadrant of space far removed from your home galaxy and you want to get home.

    You think that you can modify your transporter beam to send people through a wormhole.

    Am I close?
     
    Arouse1973 likes this.
  16. Laplace

    Laplace

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    The other moderator might be more understanding!

    i.e., Harald Kapp (Germany; Europe; Earth; Sol System; Milky Way; Laniakea)
     
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  17. programmer

    programmer

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    Oct 18, 2014
    sir....i cant understand ur jocking o me or u r saying really..........i didnt asked about warm holes......i just imagined a thing and i want to know is it possible in anyway or not so placed my idea here....nw i came to know it is nt possible...any thanks to one and all sir
     
  18. davenn

    davenn Moderator

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    hi programmer

    NO, waves don't transport things in the way you imagine

    take care

    Dave
     
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