Connect with us

Replacing Capacitor

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by richp999, Dec 22, 2013.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. richp999

    richp999

    2
    0
    Dec 22, 2013
    Hi

    Looking for some help from someone in the know...

    I am trying to fix a circuit board ; from a 20 year old jukebox ; and I'm trying to find a replacement for a capacitor on the board.

    I have attached an image, but can't seem to find anything identical to replace it with.

    From the codes on the side, I get:

    EPOC E68
    220K - (22pF ?)
    250 VDC - (250 volts dc ?)

    I have tried to decode but cant get anything to match .. Anything 22pF seems to look very different to what I have.

    Can anyone point me in the right direction where I can get hold of one of these ?

    Thanks in advance..

    Richard.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,080
    Dec 18, 2013
  3. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt

    426
    4
    Nov 12, 2013
    The "K" on these capacitors is a tolerance code. In this case, it means ±10%.

    John
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  4. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,561
    1,856
    Sep 5, 2009
    220K - (22pF ?)

    no, more likely 220,000pF ( K = 1000)

    1000pF = 1nF
    220nF (220,000pF) = 0.22uF which is a logical value for that size and type of cap

    I suspect you will discover that there is nothing wrong with that cap, the darkening on it is probably
    caused by some other component close to it getting VERY hot

    cheers
    Dave
     
  5. Arouse1973

    Arouse1973 Adam

    5,164
    1,080
    Dec 18, 2013
    I think the K is the tolerance. 220 is 22pF from what I understand just like 223 is 22nF and 224 is 220nF.
    Thanks
    Adam
     
  6. richp999

    richp999

    2
    0
    Dec 22, 2013
    Thanks Guys !!

    Arouse1973 -> Thanks, looks like the correct part.

    davenn -> I see where you're coming from. If I decode like the guides on the web, then the K means tolerance of 10%.

    However everything I find of 22pf seems very small, and this capacitor looks to me like its a bit larger... Could that be because its 240V ??

    Thanks for the replies - and so fast !!

    A bit of background - I have acquired an old juke box, which doesn't 'boot'. Power goes to the board, I can see 1 led on ; but not much else seems to be going on . I am pretty sure the board has gone down, but don't have to skill to problem solve it really. But before I send it away I was just having a glance over to see if there was anything obvious. This capacitor looked very black, and so I though it might have 'worn out'. Thought it would be cheap and easy to swap to give a try.

    So I'm not sure what it does in the circuit.

    I attached a pic of the other side of the capacitor that made me think it was blown. Any opinions from people who have seen this before ? I have also attached a pic of the surrounding area, you can see where I removed it. Nothing else seems to be black/burnt out.

    Do you think its normal for this type of thing to go wrong (the capacitor)..

    Any ideas gratefully received :)

    Thanks

    Richard.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. jpanhalt

    jpanhalt

    426
    4
    Nov 12, 2013
    If it were still in-circuit, then one might debate whether to replace it. As noted by Dave, that is not a common failure point. However, it has been removed from the circuit.

    That allows it to be tested (if you have a tester) and to replace it easily. Buy two, because you may find the second gets hot too. Capacitors have a ripple current rating, and too much ripple, which can be a sign of failure elsewhere in the circuit, can lead to overheating and maybe failure.

    This question has already been addressed, but just for reference, here is how to interpret tho codes used on that capacitor. The value, after adjustment for the multiplier, is read in picofarads.
    Capture.PNG

    John
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2013
  8. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,561
    1,856
    Sep 5, 2009
    yes the K is probably the tolerance, fair call :)

    BUT that is way too big for a 22p in that style of case ... maybe, but I would be suprised

    if it is it would be un usual .... a capacitance meter would let the truth out ;)

    Dave
     
  9. KrisBlueNZ

    KrisBlueNZ Sadly passed away in 2015

    8,393
    1,268
    Nov 28, 2011
    A bit of Googling tells me that this is an EPOC (brand) E68 (series) dipped, metallised polyester film (PETP) capacitor for general purpose use.

    EPOC don't seem to have a web site. The main agent is Anglia Components, http://www.angliac.co.uk and according to their data sheet, a marking of 220 means 22 pF. The K means 10% as is usual for capacitor markings. The reason it's kind of big is partly the voltage, and partly the materials and construction.

    Depending on where it is in the circuit, the failure could have been caused by a large mains surge (due to a lightning strike nearby, perhaps). In that case, other components could well have been damaged, although they may not show any visible sign.

    Can you show us a photo of the whole board, with an indication of where the capacitor was located? That might help. If possible take the photo outdoors on an overcast day (out of direct sunlight, at least). That gives the best all-round illumination. A photo of the track side could help too.

    As for a replacement, I've looked on Digikey and Mouser and couldn't find any film capacitors as low as 22 pF. The closest I could find was 100 pF: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/PFR5101J400J11L4BULK/399-7697-ND/3465849

    The value is probably not critical and you could probably use the one above. If you want 22 pF, you could probably use a mica capacitor: http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/CD15ED220JO3/338-1049-ND/337837
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-