Connect with us

Replacing Bad Motherboard Capacitors

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by [email protected], Nov 7, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Guest

    Need to replace some bad caps on a socket 7 motherboard.

    While it is old would prefer not damaging or destroying it so am
    wondering if any has cut off the bad caps leaving the leads in the
    board and then wire wrapping the new cap to these leads.

    Appreciate any tips or suggestions, especially by someone with actual
    experience.

    Thanks

    Gene OHara
     
  2. Skype_man

    Skype_man Guest

    Two ways I use: Cut off the legs, & leave just enough
    to solder on a new part, or use a hot soldering iron, not
    too hot, & use desoldering tool, or solder wick, or both,
    & just drop in the new parts. If too many capacitors are
    bad, it may not be worth it, as the CPU may be bad. Sky.
     
  3. 3T39

    3T39 Guest

    Hello, !
    You wrote on 7 Nov 2005 13:53:54 -0800:

    g> While it is old would prefer not damaging or destroying it so am
    g> wondering if any has cut off the bad caps leaving the leads in the
    g> board and then wire wrapping the new cap to these leads.

    g> Appreciate any tips or suggestions, especially by someone with actual
    g> experience.

    g> Thanks

    I've replaced lots of caps on these boards and I can tell you that whilst
    it's quite easy, you do need a bit of soldering experience to do it
    properly. I would have thought that wirewrap is going to leave a long lead
    that would pick up noise etc. I have in the past pulled a cap off but I
    always unsoldered the legs afterwards. I have found that a reliable way is
    to drill out the plated through holes by hand with a jewellers drill held in
    a pin vice, AFTER removing the legs. You have to be carefull not to damage
    the board but this always works for me. My solder sucker just doesn't have
    the suck to clear out these tiny holes. I couldn't comment about the wire
    wrapping idea as I have never tried it, but it doesn't sound like a good
    idea to me. Bear in mind that the wire leg that you're left with will have a
    chemical residue on it that might prevent a solid contact. same problem with
    trying to solder to the legs. you might as well drill the holes out and
    start again with a nice clean hole.
    With best regards, 3T39. E-mail:
     
  4. gb

    gb Guest

    I replaced 12 capacitors on an Abit AMD board (used in an HP Pavilion)
    These capacitors had a narrower lead spacing than normal - but DigiKey had
    the correct Panasonic capacitors (not cheap).

    This Abit board is a 4 layer. Good soldering techniques and experience is
    mandatory for this work. I pulled out my Pace MBT-250 for the desoldering
    work -- but even then a couple capacitors proved to be difficult to remove.
    PATIENCE is a required skill for this work -- if you get frustrated
    easily -- throw items across the room, etc. -- have someone else work on it.

    In total, it took me about one (1) hour for desoldering capacitors, cleaning
    the board of the hardened electrolytic paste from the capacitors -- that had
    already burst and solder in replacements.

    Useful web site
    http://www.motherboardrepair.com/

    gb
     
  5. CJT

    CJT Guest

    See if the manufacturer will replace them at reasonable cost.

    I had replacement done for about 20 bucks plus shipping.
     
  6. crazy frog

    crazy frog Guest

    did the same on a p2 mobo, 2caps
    near the regs on the mobo check the ones
    near anything that gets hot.
     
  7. James Sweet

    James Sweet Guest

    Those ground planes suck up a LOT of heat. I use a Weller 140W soldering
    gun to do motherboard caps, a butane soldering iron will usually work
    too if you crank it up.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-