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replacing a relay - need help with pinout

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by unicorncomputer, Aug 2, 2019.

  1. unicorncomputer

    unicorncomputer

    3
    0
    Aug 1, 2019
    [​IMG]

    I have a couple of bad relays in my 2008 dodge caliber(son's first car)


    the relay block is all corroded up and not useable.


    I have some other relays and connectors which I believe will work I just am not positive the pin conversion


    Old relay is the G8HE-1C7T-R1-DC12

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    The relay I have and want to use is this


    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    can anybody help me connect pins 1-5 to 30, 85, 86, 87 and 87a


    If it matters, my scenario there is nothing wired to pin 4 of the current corroded relay.


    Thank you in advance for any guidance you can provide.


    Steve
     
  2. dave9

    dave9

    794
    186
    Mar 5, 2017
    This makes no sense. You do not want to alter the relay box so it takes nonstandard relays. Just buy the right relay already. They're about $11 each on Amazon, etc. If you live in a 3rd world country where any parts are seized by pirates and all parties executed, so this is your only option, mention that. I don't get the feeling you live on that kind of island?

    If the contacts in the relay box are fouled, pull them out and see if you can clean them off (acid if necessary) and plate them (solder) for protection from oxidation, or just get a new box or contacts/harness-pigtail from a junkyard if new OEM parts are too expensive.

    Do NOT alter this from standard factory wiring. There is no worse nightmare for techs servicing this and it tanks the resale value to the point of being ghetto modded trash. You'll reduce the resale value by ~20X as much as it costs to do it right.

    I can appreciate that you understand it could work electrically, but it's a whole different ball game with a vehicle. Keep it standardized, with the factory config. It needs to remain the same circuit, parts (compatible, including 3rd party replacements) and layout as it came from the factory.

    If it were a 30 year old vehicle worth $300 (about scrap value) then I might change my tune towards cheapest way to keep it running because it's going to a junkyard the next time there is a fault, but in your case, this vehicle has value still and that should be retained.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2019
    Cannonball likes this.
  3. unicorncomputer

    unicorncomputer

    3
    0
    Aug 1, 2019
    I am just looking for a pin out between the two
     

    Attached Files:

  4. unicorncomputer

    unicorncomputer

    3
    0
    Aug 1, 2019
    is the screen capture in previous post correct
     
  5. dave9

    dave9

    794
    186
    Mar 5, 2017
    https://www.mouser.com/datasheet/2/307/en-g8he-267580.pdf

    This is the datasheet for your old relay. You can see the diagram on it, indicating pins 1 and 2 are the coil, corresponding to #85 and 86.

    Yes your screencap is correct.

    Pin #4, if it is/was present at all, would be the normally closed terminal that corresponds to 87a.

    #3 is the common terminal corresponding to #30.

    #5 is the normally open contact that is energized when the relay coil is, and corresponds to #87.

    You can just buy the correct relay to do a straightforward repair. Here in the US it costs under $10 and is a common size, so you can have it fit where the old one was, cleaning up the contacts in the relay box if necessary to make it work.

    Again you do not need to use this larger, different terminal location, higher current rated relay, unless you are modifying this circuit to power a greater load from something you've added on, that didn't come from the factory.

    In THAT case of adding a new load, I still wouldn't do it, would instead take the NO pin 87 from the correct relay for the vehicle to an additional relay for the added load, putting pin 87 to pin 85 on the additional relay and grounding pin 86, battery to pin 30, pin 87 to the newly added load. This is partially because the wring to the original relay is only meant to handle what the relay was, as well as anything upstream of it towards the battery. You can check all that for wire gauge and fuse ratings, or just avoid the issue by dedicating a new relay to the new load. There is no reason to butcher this instead of keeping it the same as it left the factory, save for some wire splicing if you need to swap in new pigtails for the relay contacts in the box. You can get those from a junkyard if necessary, even the whole relay box if the box is molten/charred/etc.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2019
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