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Repairing Lightning Damaged Tv's

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by CJ, Jun 13, 2004.

  1. <snip>

    So, I need an earthed coaxial socket. When a storm approaches, I pull
    the aerial out of the TV and put it into the earthed socket rather
    than just leave it trailing on the floor.

    I read once that although disconnecting the aerial is good, you should
    not do it when the storm is close. You would not want to be holding
    the aerial lead when lightning struck your aerial. This seemed to
    make sense, I regard myself as more valuable than the TV (I wonder if
    my son would agree).

    Actually in my case, the aerial first goes to an RF amplifier, then to
    a digital terrestrial receiver and then to a video before it reaches
    the TV. Conveniently, these devices are in increasing cost sequence
    so the cheap ones are protecting the more expensive. If my aerial was
    hit by lightning, would just the RF amplifier get fried or might the
    whole chain through to the (multiple) TVs die?

    Seán O'Leathlóbhair
     
  2. w_tom

    w_tom Guest

    Even the National Electrical Code requires that your outside antenna
    be earthed. Many installers don't bother if you don't complain. If
    the outside antenna is not earthed, then there is where you start for
    protection of your TV. Again, there are additional requirements as
    summarized in previous posts. IOW minimum protection means your
    antenna first meet NEC requirements. Does it?
     
  3. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Sean O'Leathlobhair" bravely wrote to "All" (21 Jun 04 03:16:24)
    --- on the heady topic of "Re: Repairing Lightning Damaged Tv's"

    SO> From: (Sean O'Leathlobhair)

    SO> I read once that although disconnecting the aerial is good, you should
    SO> not do it when the storm is close. You would not want to be holding
    SO> the aerial lead when lightning struck your aerial. This seemed to
    SO> make sense, I regard myself as more valuable than the TV (I wonder if
    SO> my son would agree).

    Lightning doesn't have to strike for one to get a nice jolt. For
    example, I recall one summer afternoon in the park, where there is a
    beautiful turtle pond, a storm was approaching from the west. While
    still perhaps a half mile away some chimneys of the homes near the
    park started to glow strangely in the growing darkness. For anyone who
    ever read Melville's epic "Moby Dick", the origin of the glow was
    therein described as St. Elmo's Fire. Indeed as a storm approaches an
    electrical gradient builds up between the ground and the cloud level
    that will ultimately reach a breakover point. This breakover is the
    cause of lightning. However until that point is reached, a tall
    conductive structure can be at a very much higher potential than the
    ground around them and if touched can give a jolt. Doesn't anyone
    remember Benjamin Franklin's kite with a key on the string experiment?
    Ground your antenna system. Use a knife switch like Uncle Fester!

    A*s*i*m*o*v

    .... Sattinger's Law: It works better if you plug it in.
     
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