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Repairing ATM keypads

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by bigbeard, Jul 12, 2012.

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  1. bigbeard

    bigbeard

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    Aug 10, 2011
    Hello all, I have been trying to find information from the Internet about ATM keypads but I cannot come up with much. ATM keypads run over 500 dollars and may randomly go bad causing expensive repairs. There are companies that offer repair services for about 200 dollars, more or less, but if possible, I would like to repair it myself. The companies that offer keypad repair claim it takes up to 2 weeks repair; this is too long for an ATM to be out of service.

    Does anyone have any knowledges this subject? Any info would be appreciated. Repair companies make it sound like its a lengthy/tedious process, though that means it's not impossible.

    If you google hyosung keypad or hyosung keypad circuit you can find pictures of. Even if i cannot repair the device, it cold still be cheaper to replace the parts in it if I could find suppliers, but I don't even know what parts sold be changed out.
     
  2. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
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    Apr 7, 2012
    Best to invest in an extra keypad so when one is being serviced you have a spare to use temporarily...

    If they are only charging $200 isn't not a lengthy process but it very well might be tedious and troublesome...

    That entire statement is contradictory...

    From a quick glance it appears the that it's more than just a keyboard, but an entire keyboard sub assembly circuit... Without direct knowledge of how it works (possibly a schematic) you are going to be fighting an uphill battle just figuring out what is wrong... And yes you have to source the parts as well that can be an uphill battle in itself, short of purchasing new keypads and gutting them for parts...

    In the end if you don't have the knowledge to tackle this yourself already, you are likely looking at a big uphill battle, and in the end the 2 weeks and $200 is likely going to be a blessing vs doing it yourself... I'm not saying you can't do it yourself but you really need to lay down a plan of attack, you need to take a non functional one apart first and see what is failing, see if you can source that part or parts and hope you have the skills to fix it... You can certainly do all this yourself and get a better grasp of the situation at hand... This is all stuff the 'repair' companies already know, and it affords them the ability to quick fix for a reasonable price... If you want to tackle it yourself you will need to educated yourself in the same knowledge... In the end it might be simple over the counter tactile buttons that are failing and can easily be swapped out but you won't know until you tear into one and diagnose the failure...
     
  3. bigbeard

    bigbeard

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    Aug 10, 2011
    I appreciate your response. I do agree that I do need to do sufficient research before I tackle this project and that is why I am scouring the Internet for advice. The time needed and the skills I must obtain do not put me off from learning and trying. I have over 200 ATM machines, parts go bad all the time and buying parts or repairs adds up quickly. I have already learned a lot about the certain brand I use, but encrypted keypads are more complex than my knowledge can currently handle.

    The time spent learning would pay off in a very short period.
     
  4. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    5
    Apr 7, 2012
    If you want to go at it yourself all I can suggest is take one apart and start diagnosing the failures... It might pay to take a lot of pictures or a video when you take it apart so that you can put it back together properly...
     
  5. Jpchrispin

    Jpchrispin

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    Aug 18, 2014
    I am trying something's too with a hyosung 1500 keypad we get a dead keypad once every few months it's a bit annoying when you don't know what caused it and if it is just a battery replacement anyways opened one up by unscrewing it the warning label says don't open or damage will occur but if it is dead I can't see harm I think I will put a jumper on the 2 jumper pins then replace battery then after I put it together pull off jumper besides that there is only the 2 dip switches and #1 is to clear clear keys and reset keypad if that doesn't work I will try to flip #2 then take it apart
     
  6. Gryd3

    Gryd3

    4,098
    875
    Jun 25, 2014
    The xbox 360 had numerous e-fuses that could be tripped if it was tinkered with. Many were tripped during legitimate home repair.
    I can imagine ATMs and keypads have something similar. A security breach on one of those products could be a disaster for the the manufacturer.
    If you take one apart, you should already have accepted that it may never work again. If it does work after reassembly, then congrats ;)
     
  7. shake

    shake

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    0
    Apr 13, 2017

    Yes this is a crazy old thread. But it is still relevant, as I came across it via a google search in my quest to solve the exact same issue.

    I just want to point out, these keypads have a non rechargeable internal battery, therefore a limited shelf life. You are literally wasting money by keeping one on the shelf. When the battery dies, it wipes the firmware. When you send it in and pay a ridiculous fee, as far as I know, all they are doing is reflashing the firmware and soldering in a new battery.

    I have found the battery for sale at Batteries Plus for $3 (FYI It's the same one used as the NVRAM battery on a Hyosung 1800CE ATM Mainboard that ATM parts sellers charge $20 for)

    But that does us no good unless we can flash the firmware back ourselves. I came across an ebay seller that was selling his repair service for $130. I Google mapped his shipping address, it's just a residential apartment. Obviously you don't need a high tech facility to do this.
     
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