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Repair electric kettle (Klarstein) - broken power switch

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Inoperable, Sep 12, 2018.

  1. Inoperable

    Inoperable

    1
    0
    Sep 12, 2018
    Looks like a planned obsolescence to me - the plastic power switch broke.

    Pic1: The broken pieces from the power switch. Measurements in centimeters.
    Pic2: The power switch is to the left.
    Pic3: Off
    Pic4: On

    The question is - how do I repair it?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. dave9

    dave9

    710
    159
    Mar 5, 2017
    I don't really know what I'm looking at, besides it looking like they built the switch from scratch. I'd solder that together and put a hole in the base for a panel mount switch to replace it, one with a phenolic resin body instead of plastic so it has the needed temperature resistance... or just hard wire it and unplug at the wall when done using it, though that can eventually be hard on the wall socket, especially with high current (heating) appliances.
     
  3. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,431
    695
    Oct 5, 2014
    Switch is both a mechanical flip flop arrangement and a steam temperature cut out.

    You definitely do not want to be bridging out any control switch.

    The centre contacts (photo 3) becoming open under the high current will eventually blow and you could end up with electrical burns.

    Bin it.
     
  4. dave9

    dave9

    710
    159
    Mar 5, 2017
    ^ In that case wire a thermal cutoff switch in series with the new switch. Measure the temperature of the heating element to select the right temperature value and mount it to the heating element. Then again, it might already have one.
     
  5. Bluejets

    Bluejets

    3,431
    695
    Oct 5, 2014
    While you're at it, get a certification.
    Oh, I don't know, maybe $30,000.00 should cover it.
    Don't be so ridiculous.
    It's a $30 jug for cryin' out loud.
     
  6. dave9

    dave9

    710
    159
    Mar 5, 2017
    ^ I have repaired many, many things over the years. None have burst into flame or done any harm.

    A switch and a thermal cutoff are $2. If the product costs $30 then 1/15th of that to repair it seems reasonable, and eliminates the manufacturing materials, expense, and pollution of making a replacement as well as not adding the original to a landfill.

    If it is your personal preference not to repair things, you can just put "throw it away" in your sig and not have to reply with post content at all. :D

    The topic was how to repair it, not how to throw it away. It is fair for Inoperable to get both sides of the argument and realize that this isn't rocket surgery.
     
  7. dave9

    dave9

    710
    159
    Mar 5, 2017
    (continued because my ISP crapped out for a while) Granted, there was minimal info provided. If this makeshift switch they integrated, latches on until a certain temperature and then permanently disengages, a thermal switch alone will not replace that.

    I also skipped a few details. For example if the makeshift switch directly contacts the burner then soldering around it really means a brass crimp onto the burner as solder may not be fit for the heat level. Similarly if a piece of wire is needed to jumper around the original switch mechanism and connect to the burner then it may need be silicone or asbestos/etc insulated to withstand the heat.

    At some point only the person who has the widget in front of them can make these decisions if that info is not provided.
     
  8. umer797

    umer797

    1
    0
    Feb 15, 2019
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