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recommendation on 2-speed swimming pool pump

Discussion in 'Home Power and Microgeneration' started by terri, Oct 30, 2010.

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  1. terri

    terri Guest

    can anyone recommend a specific type or brand of pump/motor, 1 HP max, for in-ground
    swimming pool?

    my current understanding is that there are two speed motors that run at low speed
    (half power) enough to
    circulate water and can be switched to the full speed to run automatic pool sweepers
    (like creepy crawly, pool vac)
     
  2. Ecnerwal

    Ecnerwal Guest

    No particular recommendation, but I have one of these (gifted, taken for
    project value of the motor (it had been "rebuilt" - impeller glued back
    together, and had already fallen apart again) half speed (which is what
    it runs) is more like 1/8-1/4 power. Should be common as dirt at pool
    suppliers. I don't recall the brand and it's not anywhere near the
    computer to go check it. None of them are made all that well from what I
    have seen.
     
  3. Twayne

    Twayne Guest

    In
    The ones I've seen are pulse-modulated so the slower it runs without
    stalliing the less current it pulls. I've never come across one for an in
    ground pool though. I imagine since it has to be continuous duty it's too
    hard to dissipate the heat properly unless it's pulse-modulated, something
    that's not good to use outdoors under varying loads (filter fresh/needs
    bumping/cleaning, etc.). They run awfully hot by design when they operate
    continuously in the hot sun. Won't burn skin instantly but keep your hand
    there too long and under your hand, insulated will make you pull your hand
    away n a hurry!

    I've always found Hayward to have good product that outlasts most others,
    around here anyway where they only get used 4 to 6 months per year.
     
  4. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    After doing some high electric bill complaints for a local electric utility,
    many polished pool owners told me they just put cycle timers on their pumps.
    A few hours twice or once per day was enough.

    Apparently the "chemicals are cheaper" and the low speed may not have enoug
    velocity to reach the far corners of the pool anyway.

    I was told the savings were significant.


    can anyone recommend a specific type or brand of pump/motor, 1 HP max, for
    in-ground
    swimming pool?

    my current understanding is that there are two speed motors that run at low
    speed
    (half power) enough to
    circulate water and can be switched to the full speed to run automatic pool
    sweepers
    (like creepy crawly, pool vac)
     
  5. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    I do not and will not own a pool so I do not know the chemicals used or
    needed.

    I am only telling you what pool owners have told me.

    Pretty hard to run a 2HP pool motor with 7 amps. I doubt inflatables pools
    don't count on any of thes items.
    ..

    Every inground pool I've ever seen has a timer. Conventional wisdom
    is that you're supposed to run it long enough to circulate water equal
    to the pool volume each day. However, I think a lot depends on
    climate, usage, etc. I've run one less than that each day with no
    problems.
    If by chemicals, you mean putting in algaecide or other chemicals to
    make up for less circulation and filtering, I doubt it's worth it. A
    1hp pool pump only draws about 7 amps. If you run it 8 hours a day,
    that's about $75 a month. If you cut it in half, you'd save ~$37 a
    month, which doesn't seem like a lot in the pool world. And I don't
    know about you, but I'd rather have less chemicals in mine than more.
     
  6. Oren

    Oren Guest

    From my utility company web site: (offers $200.00 rebate)*

    "While Two-Speed Pumps are adequate for older pools, Variable-Speed
    Pumps presently provide the greatest potential for energy savings.
    Variable speed pumps allow greater flexibility and can be programmed
    for multiple speeds at the desired flow rate for each application."

    Here are several good reasons to replace your single-speed pool pump
    today:

    - Save up to 80% on energy costs associated with pool operation

    - Variable speed pumps run cooler and quieter, which helps the pump
    last longer

    - Filter works more efficiently to keep the pool water more clean,
    clear and healthy "

    http://www.nvenergy.com/saveenergy/home/rebates/poolpumps.cfm

    I would consider the Pentair brand.
     
  7. Bob F

    Bob F Guest

    Spa pumps are frequently 2 speed. The low speed is maybe 1/3 the water flow of
    the high speed. A simple 2 throw switch could enable you to switch speeds, if
    you don't need that automated.
     
  8. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    I found it hard to seperate information when I was a newbie also.

    Do you consider yourself a pool, energy, or Usenet expert?

    I do know one thing...it is proably cheaper, at the advice of experienced
    people, and simple math, to use chemicals in a pool a than to run a 1 HP
    pump motor 24/7 with PG&E TOU rates during the day. Even the eight hour peak
    usage rate of 58.2 cents /kWh (200% of base consumption) (you understand
    energy units and rates, right?) x 8 x 1HP / 80% efficiency

    = $134.60 per month. (peak TOU consumption only not including any taxes or
    delivery charges)
    http://www.pge.com/tariffs/tm2/pdf/ELEC_SCHEDS_E-6.pdf


    How does a few extra chemicals needed fare to shutting the pump down during
    peak hours. Time for **YOU** to wake up now and give advice on some energy
    stats vs pool chemical stats. Some will be waiting for you expert advice
    comparing the two.


    The poster asked specifically about a 1HP motor, which is enough for
    filtering even a 50,000 gallon pool, hardly an inflatable pool. You
    may go back to sleep now. Perhaps if you don't own or know anything
    about a pool other than what you've heard, you shouldn't be giving
    advice.
     
  9. Oren

    Oren Guest

    I don't, but the OP asked about pool pumps and nothing about
    chemicals. How did you get to chemicals in a simple thread?
     
  10. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    How did you nymshift without being able to read such a simple thread?



    I don't, but the OP asked about pool pumps and nothing about
    chemicals. How did you get to chemicals in a simple thread?


    Do you consider yourself a pool, energy, or Usenet expert?
     
  11. The Henchman

    The Henchman Guest

    "terri" wrote in message
    can anyone recommend a specific type or brand of pump/motor, 1 HP max, for
    in-ground
    swimming pool?

    my current understanding is that there are two speed motors that run at low
    speed
    (half power) enough to
    circulate water and can be switched to the full speed to run automatic pool
    sweepers
    (like creepy crawly, pool vac)

    ----------


    I use a Hayward for an inground 16 x 32 x 9.5 ft pool. It's 230 v x 7.5
    amps. Most people in my town use Hayward motors and all three swimming
    pool sales and service shops sell them and recommend them.

    It's easy to prime, and easy to clean the strainer. My pump runs 24 hours a
    day.
     
  12. Oren

    Oren Guest

    J Unit,

    Nymshift? You cannot be that dense. I have four brothers named Oren
    (one deceased).
     
  13. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    Then why use so many different names on Usenet?


    Nymshift? You cannot be that dense. I have four brothers named Oren
    (one deceased).
     
  14. Oren

    Oren Guest

    You speak of things you know nothing about! Nor, have you or anyone
    else seen me nymshift.

    I'm done with you and your lame troll conversation. I hope others see
    you for what you are -- a none help to the OP about pumps.

    Someone that answers a question with a question. See ya.
     
  15. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    Now can you stay on topic or would you rather be mud slinging?

    Try reading the thread first, next time.


    You speak of things you know nothing about! Nor, have you or anyone
    else seen me nymshift.

    I'm done with you and your lame troll conversation. I hope others see
    you for what you are -- a none help to the OP about pumps.

    Someone that answers a question with a question. See ya.
     
  16. Oren

    Oren Guest

    As a second owner of my home with Hayward pool equipment I can say
    the first pump motor lasted at least seven years, before I changed
    the motor out with a new Emerson brand motor.

    Having seen a few Pentair motors running, noticing the silence and
    lack of noise I would suggest the Pentair motors today.

    My next one will be Pentair, variable speed.
     
  17. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    You obviously consider yourself an expert at pool maintenance, electrical,
    motors and Usenet.

    You have provided no information , as asked, on pool chemical costs, you
    have made assumptions about the OP's whereabouts, profess to be a motor
    expert, are currently making you fourth post, under this new name, and do
    not understand electrical consumption rates and tried to twist the thread
    into your personal victory, instead of offering helpful information to the
    OP.

    Since you babble a bunch of pool nonsense in an electrical group. We'll just
    leave your babble with the opinion of another wannabe troll.



    No, but like others in this thread, I have owned pools and spas and
    maintained them myself, so I have considerable direct experience. I
    have a Taylor pool test kit used by professionals, do all my own water
    testing and chemical application. You, on the other hand, have never
    even owned a pool.



    Lets look at all the residential rates PG&E had in effect in June
    2010.


    http://sheet.zoho.com/view.do?url=http://www.pge.com/tariffs/ResElecCurrent.xls

    The highest baseline rate was 12cents kwh, 130% of baseline was 13.5
    cents, 200% was 29 cents, 300% and over was 40 cents. The average
    rate was 18 cents. So tell us first, where the poster asking for
    advice indicated that he was a PG&E customer. Then tell us how that
    58 cents is a reasonable estimate for the cost of electricity for a
    typical residence in the USA. The rate schedule you used appears to
    be targeted at residences with SOLAR POWER. Did the poster say
    anything about solar power? Every reasonable poster here knows only
    a loon would impute a 58 cents per kwh to a typical residential
    electric user in the USA. I can show you widespread rate table from
    the DOE that show more typical is 9 cents to 18 cents, which probably
    covers 95%+ of us.

    Next, the whole point of this thread is that with a two speed pump,
    you run it mostly in low speed. It;s rated at 1hp when run at HIGH
    speed. At low speed it runs at a fraction of that power and moves the
    same amount of water with 40% to 60% less electricity. So, even
    using your faulty number of $135 a month, running at low speed the
    pump would use about half that, or a mere $70 a month. Now tell us
    what kind of additional chemicals would be involved and how much they
    cost to do it your idiotic way.





    Show me where I ever said he has to run his pump during peak hours.
    In fact, I stated from the very beginning that every pool pump I have
    ever seen has been on a timer. Explain to us why he can't use a dual
    speed pump and run it in low speed mode when energy rates are low, ie
    all night long. You could get 12 hours a day at the offpeak rate,
    which would be fine. If more filtering were needed, the pump could
    also be run at times when the rates are moderate, not peak.

    Explain why as another poster pointed out, some utilities are
    offering REBATES to get people to move to multi-speed pumps and in
    some places, they are being required on new pools. Show us any
    credible pool website that says it's cost effective to rely on
    addional chemicals instead of adquate filtration. Everyone
    knowledgable about pools that I've ever read always says that proper
    pool maintenance begins with adequate circulation. Also tell us how
    you'd have a clue as to how what additional chemicals might be needed
    to maintain a pool without adequate circulation and how much they
    would cost.


    And since you dragged PG&E into it, take a look at this gem from the
    PG&E website:

    http://www.pge.com/myhome/saveenergymoney/rebates/seasonal/poolpumps/

    "Swimming Pool Filtration Pumps and Motors.ShareRSSPrintGet a $100
    Rebate

    Did you know that a single speed pool pump and motor can account for
    up to 20% of your home’s total electrical costs? Installing a new
    multi-speed pump and motor can save you energy and money. Residential
    and multifamily pool owners can get a $100 rebate for replacing an
    old, single speed pump and motor with a new qualifying multi-speed
    system."





    Yet here you are, making a complete ass of yourself. Had enough?
     
  18. Guest

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 07:07:22 -0700 (PDT), wrote:
    Stop feeding the trolls.
     
  19. Josepi

    Josepi Guest

    OK

    <PLONK>


    Stop feeding the trolls.


    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 07:07:22 -0700 (PDT), wrote:
     
  20. Guest

    Top-posting liar.
     
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