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rechargeable batteries, odd size

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by MrEE, Oct 28, 2012.

  1. MrEE

    MrEE

    84
    0
    Apr 13, 2012
    Hi all,

    I am trying to replace the 11 battery cells (1.2V) inside a battery pack. The batteries are not standard size. They measure 1.1" x 0.66" or 28 mm x 16.8 mm. They look like shrunk C size batteries.
    Anyone knows where to find new ones? The battery pack belongs to a Icom IC-A20 Transceiver.
     
  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,175
    2,690
    Jan 21, 2010
    Are they not the relatively common (almost ubiquitous) sub-C batteries?

    (No need to post in the wanted/for sale section if you're just after hints as to where to purchase something)
     
  3. MrEE

    MrEE

    84
    0
    Apr 13, 2012
    I looked for sub-C batteries on e-bay, but they measure 42mm x 22mm (more than one seller).
     
  4. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
    2/3A is the cell you seek... Sometimes universally branded as 1/2A (although true 1/2A should be just a smidgen less tall)... Check the manufactures specs if size is crucial...
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2012
  5. Raven Luni

    Raven Luni

    798
    7
    Oct 15, 2011
    Why isnt there a B? Always wondered that...
     
  6. MrEE

    MrEE

    84
    0
    Apr 13, 2012
    Bingo!! thanks CocaCola and all the other replies. I never heard of the 2/3A before.
     
  7. CocaCola

    CocaCola

    3,635
    4
    Apr 7, 2012
  8. MrEE

    MrEE

    84
    0
    Apr 13, 2012
    I suspect the original batteries are NiCd, but in general is it a good idea to use NiMH batteries instead? how about different capacity than the original ones?
     
  9. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,175
    2,690
    Jan 21, 2010
    Only use NiMH if your charger supports them. Otherwise they will not be happy.

    Also note that NiMH have a higher voltage and higher impedance than NiCd. Either of these may be an issue (but often are not)
     
  10. BobK

    BobK

    7,601
    1,643
    Jan 5, 2010
    NiCad are also better at large current draws than NIMH. I learned this when I tried to replace batteries for my drill / driver with NIMH. Even though the voltage was the same and capacity was higher, the NIMH were anemic. I had to go back to NiCad.

    Bob
     
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