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Rechargeable alkalines?

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Jacobe Hazzard, Nov 10, 2004.

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  1. Would these batteries be a good choice for use in a bicycle LED blinking
    lights?

    The application is low drain, alkaline batteries typically last me about a
    year, but I'm loathe to use disposable batteries in anything these days.
    I'm told that rechargeable alkalines don't exhibit the same self-discharge
    characteristics of other batteries like NiMH.

    I would also like to put rechargeable alkalines to use in other low-drain
    apps, like remote controls. Interested to hear what people think of them.

    Adam
     
  2. Guest

    Avoid rechargable Alkalines. They are bascially a gimick and a very
    poor choice for almost all applications.
    They are a crap technology, have reliability issues, and frequently can
    and do simply "die" for no apparent reason. This is the last thing you
    want for your bicycle lights I'm sure.

    If you are getting 1 years use from a set of Alkalines then I'd say you
    are going great, and you should not be feeling guilty about replacing
    them once a year. You could perhaps even put the "dead" ones to use in
    very low power devices like a wall clock.

    Perhaps you could even try D cells with a DC-DC converter to give you
    much high capacity than say AA's.

    For infrequent use long life items you simply cannot beat
    non-rechargable alkalines, and the newer lithiums etc. Rechargable
    Alkalines for infrequenct use items would cost you a fortune compared
    to regular Alkaline.
    every year is insignificant compared to the amount of power and waste a
    single person such as yourself uses every day.

    If you want to talk environmental issues with batteries, I'm involved
    in a project which has the potential to use 20 *TONS* of Alkaline
    batteries for a single use! We try to push the customer towards a
    rechargable solution, but they want Alkalines. The amount of guilt I
    feel is incredible!

    Regards
    Dave :)
     
  3. peterken

    peterken Guest

    some apps do not allow rechargeables
    voltage of rechargeables usually 1.2V as opposed to 1.45V for "normal"
    batteries
    Would these batteries be a good choice for use in a bicycle LED blinking
    lights?

    The application is low drain, alkaline batteries typically last me about a
    year, but I'm loathe to use disposable batteries in anything these days.
    I'm told that rechargeable alkalines don't exhibit the same self-discharge
    characteristics of other batteries like NiMH.

    I would also like to put rechargeable alkalines to use in other low-drain
    apps, like remote controls. Interested to hear what people think of them.

    Adam
     
  4. Well, this is bad news for sure, but thanks for the warning guys.

    I did have some bad experiences with rechargeable alkalines probably 8
    years ago, I was hoping they had improved.

    Thanks.
     
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