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Really Need Advice Making Micro Wind Farm

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by Robmcg, Nov 20, 2016.

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  1. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
    6x3ft to guess, Maybe able to fit 7x4ft, something else that I am curious about is how they deal with cross winds, as I get a lot of that. Traditional windmills swivel, I really don't know how verticals would deal with sudden wind changes.

    Also something that inspired this idea, Lincoln Electric's world head quarter's is less then 2 miles from me and they have a 400~ft windmill to help power their plant. 1 Floor up and you can see it clear as day, I am at the same altitude of that massive windmill.
     
  2. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Not sure which is height and which is radius/diameter, but something that size will experience a very large force trying to blow it over. Have you thought how you would safely anchor it to the building? You wouldn't want it landing on some passing pedestrian down at ground level :eek:.
     
  3. BobK

    BobK

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    Gravity does not help with rotating the blades of a windmill!

    A vertical windmill does not have to be pointed into the wind, it operates with wind from any direction, which is one of its major advantages.

    Bob
     
    Robmcg likes this.
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Then there are things like blade balance and gyroscopic forces to contend with.

    As far as rotating the whole show for wind direction.......the old Southern Cross water pumps have done it for the last 100 years or so....
    I'd say about half a dozen of these might get close to your 25Kwh/day
     

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  5. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    alternator is already 3 phase ac....allbeit at about 80v or so...the dc comes from an onboard array of diodes. Regulator finally dresses this down to the usual 15v dc approx.
     
  6. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
    I definitely wouldn't want that. 7Hx4W Circumference. 80pound slab of poured concrete? attached to its 4 point feet maybe?!
     
  7. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    I wish I paid more attention in welding school. At least I would have had a basic understanding of this stuff. So if I get a AC Alternator for grid tie in, I would get a better efficiency as I don't have to worry about the conversion loss? Also I do know that Tesla's AC allows the use of smaller gauge wires to carry X over a longer distance without losing power like Edison's DC. So AC is bound to save me money on wiring over DC right?

    Could I direct connect the windmill to this, then the wall or am I still missing steps? Would this work? ebay item
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2016
  8. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Do you mean 6 of the windmills or the generators? Cause they sell a 25kwh water pump motor.

    HEY QUESTION!! I saw on some survival show a while back and would really like to know if it is true and or viable. Could I just buy an electric motor i.e. treadmill motor is what they used on the show, and spin it backwards to generate a current? Would it be at all close to producing the power that it is rated to consume, if you turned it in reverse at the same RPM?
     
  9. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Using the formula I posted earlier, and assuming a 25% efficiency for the turbine, that would produce about 70W in a 20mph wind.
    Wrong. Neither the frequency nor the voltage of a wind-turbine-driven alternator is constant, so conversion to mains frequency and voltage would be necessary. As for grid tie-in, forget it. The linesman working for your grid utility company won't appreciate getting shocked or killed by power you're putting into the grid when he thinks he's disconnected the power :eek:.
    A treadmill motor can certainly be used as a generator.

    Edit: This article may be helpful.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2016
  10. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    that is really promising so 1.2KW a day at 50w average / 1.6kw a day at 70w average. Assuming I get a powerfull enough generator and a gear pulley system that works well that could be drastically increased right?

    So I don't plan on directly tying the wiring into the grid. I saw a video Youtube link from a local company using this product Ebay Link (scroll all the way down on the item to see the details), which if I understand it correctly, converts the power and supplies power to the grid just by plugging it in (once you're generating power) it will also auto disconnect the power to the grid if it detects power from the grid has been lost.

    Awesome good to know :)

    This was indeed a good read and now I at least understand the differences between most verticals.
     
  11. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    No.

    The power you can get depends on the wind shouted and the swept area of the blades.

    So, for the same wind speed, the diameter of the blades must be extended by 41% to double the power.
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2016
  12. Alec_t

    Alec_t

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    Not very promising. If one 7ft x 4ft turbine gave 70W then you would need 15 turbines each that size to get 1kW ! You'd need a huge balcony to site them :).
     
  13. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
    Yeah you're right, I suck at this game :( Atleast this is very educational for me and I feel a lot more comfortable with windmills and general information about them for the future. My goal is 500w an hour to be cost effective. So you're definitely right, 70 is pretty far off from that.
     
  14. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    You can't have 500W per hour. That's like 45 miles per hour per hour. Watts are a measure of how fast energy is flowing, Wh are a measure of energy.

    You might want 500Wh per hour, which essentially means an average of 500W.

    It is more sensible to talk about an average power (W), or energy per day (Wh or kWh).
     
  15. spaceman

    spaceman

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    In the Normandy invasion cloud cover kept allied bombers from hitting the German pill boxes by three miles. Had it been a clear day the expectation was the targets would have been mitigated and that the invasion would have went unopposed.
     
  16. NMNeil

    NMNeil

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  17. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
    I would love to get 1kw per hour and that would cover about 95% of my total energy usage but I would still be ecstatic for 400-700w per hour, of course average.
     
  18. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
  19. Robmcg

    Robmcg

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    Nov 20, 2016
    I didn't know that but that is very interesting to learn.
     
  20. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

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    And I would love you to understand what you're talking about.

    It's ironic that you quote my explanation of the mistake you're making, only for you to repeat the same mistake again.
     
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