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Radio Silence

Discussion in 'General Electronics Discussion' started by kittysoman2013, May 27, 2020.

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  1. kittysoman2013

    kittysoman2013

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    May 27, 2020
    My father recently died. He was a hoarder of epic proportions, so cleaning out all the stuff he'd amassed, is a daunting chore. I found several old radios ( 1960s & 70s) with broken antennas. I have several replacement masts that I got at a close-out, but once I opened the cases, I am unable to unscrew the machine screws that fasten the aerial to the plastic. Obviously some sort of adhesive was used to lock them in place. Any hints on how to undo these fasteners without destroying the plastic or stripping the heads?
     
  2. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Without more detail (photos etc.) impossible to say.
     
    davenn likes this.
  3. 73's de Edd

    73's de Edd

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    Aug 21, 2015
    Typically they used clear "DUCO "/ model airplane cement daubed around the screw head and part of the surrounding antenna staffs boss.
    You probably willl just have to use a #11 Exacto blade in its holder to dig out the deposition WITHIN the Phillips screw head ..
    Additionally just scrape off the portion that also might be adhered to the adjunct area and causing a release problem.
    AFTER some 60 years dry out time . . . . . I can't see ANY solvent . . . . be it, acetone-MEK-toluene-paint thinner-denatured alcohol-lacquer thinner,et al, even starting to touch that now stone hard, set adhesive.
    If you are able to manuever in, you might be able use a #411 cut off wheel mounted in a Dremel tool to alter that Phillips head into a standard screwdriver slot. Which ever " PWEMIUM TIPPED " screwdriver type is used, be SURE to press hard into the head slot, until the initial "break free" instant
    is achieved.
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2020
  4. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Biggest error people make in these circumstances is supporting the part in one hand and "operating" via the other.
    Usual outcome is a screwdriver speared through one side of the hand and out the other.
     
    TCSC47 and bushtech like this.
  5. TCSC47

    TCSC47

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    Mar 7, 2016
    Or work with it on your lap! Seen that done!

    Kittysoman2013, Are you able to drill out the heads of the screws? A bench drill is useful in such circumstances if you can fit the radio under it.

    Sorry to hear about your father. You have reminded me of my great hording and the amount of work my kids are going to have to do! I feel quite bad about that but am still having difficulty in getting rid of stuff.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 10, 2020
  6. Bluejets

    Bluejets

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    Oct 5, 2014
    Yikes...!! :eek::eek:
     
  7. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    Hording? ...Hording?
    I'll have you know my vast collection of electronic components are all essential invaluable assets, a rarity among
    lesser mortals, and my pride and joy, .... despite the fact that I won't live long enough to use all of them.
    My daughter says when I die, she's selling everything at a quarter apiece at a garage sale.
    And no, I'm not giving out my address to anybody eagerly anticipating that eventuality.
     
    TCSC47, (*steve*) and Martaine2005 like this.
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