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Quick Capacitor question

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Eugen T, Jul 27, 2004.

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  1. Eugen T

    Eugen T Guest

    Hi all,
    I have two identical circuits - both dead, so I started checking one and
    after going through bunch of dead parts (it's power amp) - dead HexFET, dead
    inverter circuit I hit some capacitor that shows resistance of 3-4 Ohms both
    ways (I don't have cap meter). Anyway, here is what's written on this cap
    (it's a cap for sure - marked C5 and has +/- on it):
    1st board:
    106M 10K - this K has small horizontal lines above and below the letter)
    0126
    2nd:
    106M 10K (same K) 0234

    According to the table that I have found it is 10*10^6 +/- 20% pF, so it is
    10uF +/- 20%.
    Please let me know if this is correct :(

    Thanks!
     
  2. Eugen T

    Eugen T Guest

    One more question..
    How would you determine voltage rating of the capacitor if it's not written
    on the cap?
     
  3. What is the supply voltage in the circuit? Could the capacitor be 10 volts?

    A 10 uF capacitor with no voltage marked is unusual.
     
  4. Mark A

    Mark A Guest

    One more question..
    Voltage rating of a capacitor does not affect the properties of the circuit
    unless it is undervolted. You can always use a higher voltage rating than in
    the original circuit for capacitors.

    The printing sometimes wears off of components and it is no longer visible,
    or it may not have been on their if some other marking from the manufacturer
    identifies the capacitor.

    I would wander around www.digikey.com (download the capacitor section of
    their parts catalog) and look at the different sizes, types, and
    manufacturer ids.
     
  5. Ross Herbert

    Ross Herbert Guest

    |Hi all,
    |I have two identical circuits - both dead, so I started checking one and
    |after going through bunch of dead parts (it's power amp) - dead HexFET, dead
    |inverter circuit I hit some capacitor that shows resistance of 3-4 Ohms both
    |ways (I don't have cap meter). Anyway, here is what's written on this cap
    |(it's a cap for sure - marked C5 and has +/- on it):
    |1st board:
    |106M 10K - this K has small horizontal lines above and below the letter)
    |0126
    |2nd:
    |106M 10K (same K) 0234
    |
    |According to the table that I have found it is 10*10^6 +/- 20% pF, so it is
    |10uF +/- 20%.
    |Please let me know if this is correct :(
    |
    |Thanks!
    |
    You are right with the value 10uF.
    My bet is that the 10 means 10V and the K means +/-20%
     
  6. Eugen T

    Eugen T Guest

    Thank you all for your suggestions.
    I looked at the circuit - it has +6, +15 and +/- 80V power lines attached to
    it.
    The capacitor's (+ means that it is an electrolytic cap, right?) positive
    terminal is attached to source of one mosfet and drain of another mosfet -
    both of those FETs (IRL640) are powered by 80V power supplies.

    Its negative end is attached via 3.5k resistor to collector of small BJT
    transistor (MPSA42).

    What kind of conclusion can I draw from this regarding capacitor's
    appropriate voltage?
    I went to local component store and *sizewise* 10uF 16V and 25V caps are
    quite similar to this one (well, my cap is axial, but no local stores carry
    axial caps, so I was looking at ones that have 2 legs at the bottom). 10uF
    100V are massive compared to mine :(
     
  7. Eric

    Eric Guest

    I thought there was a new type of capacitor called " Quick Capacitor"




    Hi all,
    I have two identical circuits - both dead, so I started checking one and
    after going through bunch of dead parts (it's power amp) - dead HexFET, dead
    inverter circuit I hit some capacitor that shows resistance of 3-4 Ohms both
    ways (I don't have cap meter). Anyway, here is what's written on this cap
    (it's a cap for sure - marked C5 and has +/- on it):
    1st board:
    106M 10K - this K has small horizontal lines above and below the letter)
    0126
    2nd:
    106M 10K (same K) 0234

    According to the table that I have found it is 10*10^6 +/- 20% pF, so it is
    10uF +/- 20%.
    Please let me know if this is correct :(

    Thanks!
     
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