Connect with us

Question regarding DVD/CD-ROM drive

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by CNDA, Jul 21, 2004.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. CNDA

    CNDA Guest

    Folks,

    I have the following question. Is there downloadable software that would
    check a dvd/cd-rom drive for problems? What's the life expectancy of a
    laptop drive? I notice that my Mashita UJDA710 isn't recording CD-R's
    properly. I've tried different brands or re-writables without success.

    I just want to make sure it's just plain aging and not something that
    can be remedied without plunking money for a new one (or new laptop).

    The date of manufacture of the drive is Jun 2001.

    Thanks for any assistance,

    César
     
  2. It's a removable drive, yes? Just try cleaning it. Couldn't hurt at this
    point.

    Mark Z.
     
  3. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    The only thing you can do is clean the laser in these drives. It is best to
    use a laser cleaning disk. There is no supported service for these drives.

    The most common failure is the laser unit, and or the driver and control
    circuits for the laser. Even if you were able to identify the defective
    parts, there is no sales support for the parts, and one would require the
    proper set-up to be able to do the calibration of the drive, if they were
    able to have the parts and replace them. This would not even be cost
    effective.

    I would suggest to try another drive to test it. If you take the computer to
    the authorized service dealer for your computer, they should normally have a
    drive in stock that they can try for you. Atleast, they will be able to
    identify if there is actually a fault with the drive.

    I have seen these CD writer type drives fail from time to time.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ==========================


    Folks,

    I have the following question. Is there downloadable software that would
    check a dvd/cd-rom drive for problems? What's the life expectancy of a
    laptop drive? I notice that my Mashita UJDA710 isn't recording CD-R's
    properly. I've tried different brands or re-writables without success.

    I just want to make sure it's just plain aging and not something that
    can be remedied without plunking money for a new one (or new laptop).

    The date of manufacture of the drive is Jun 2001.

    Thanks for any assistance,

    César
     
  4. A cleaning disc is unlikely to help much. A writer can benefit from a
    genuine cleaning, same as a player.


    Mark Z.
     
  5. CNDA

    CNDA Guest

    Thank you for your replies folks.

    I have already cleaned the laser lens with both a cleaner disk and also
    with alcohol soaked Q-Tips.

    What confounds me the most is that I can play recordings bought in the
    stores without any problems, however, for a while some CD-R's i've
    recorded have started to skip, and, lately will play half-way and then
    start not findind the next track. The track indicator starts blinking
    erraticly and the player just stalls. The Windows Media Player software
    won't even change from one track to another once you get half way
    through the disk.

    I have one older portable walkman type player (Philips- CD Rewritable
    Compatible) that will play the disks, flawlessly. It doesn't have 45
    sec ESP shock protection. I've noticed that my old Radio-Shack and
    another Hoher portables will play the recordings through only when the
    ESP is switched off.

    I'm dumbfounded. The DVD-CD-ROM drive that burned the disk refuses to
    continue playing the disk after it reaches half-way!

    Time to buy a new portable. I live in a small coastal town in Spain and
    the chances of finding a competent computer shop here are slim.

    Thanks again,

    César
     
  6. The only thing you can do is clean the laser in these drives. It is best to
    It is better to clean the pickup by carefully using compressed air and gently
    rubbing the lens clean with a clean and soft swab lightly dampened with rubbing
    alcohol.

    Cleaning discs are not overly effective, only clean the objective lens if it
    does work, and can risk damage to the optical pickup itself, namely the voice
    coil actuators and suspension components for the lens focus/tracking mechanism.

    And why do the failures occur? Also, another part that can fail in the optical
    pickup is the photosensor array.

    Failures of the pickup generally occur generally due to wearout or
    environmental factors.

    For environmental factors, dust and tobacco smoke can be killers of optical
    pickups. They can settle in places inside the pickup that cannot be accessed
    without disassembly, and most pickups cannot be dismantled for cleaning without
    destroying them in the process.

    For dust, airblasting can help in resolving this problem, provided that the
    airblast can reach inside the area of the pickup that's affected and if there's
    an exit for the dust.

    Tobacco smoke is particularly bad because they can deposit a tarish residue
    that can intercept the laser beam during its travel. It is difficult to remove
    this residue without damaging the various optical handling components inside
    the pickup, such as the grating, prisms, mirrors, etc. The residue cannot be
    removed by airblasting.
    Some optical pickups, like Sony, are pre-calibrated at the factory. But, I
    don't what condition Panasonic optical pickups are when they are distributed.
    Matsushita Electric, the manufacturer of the drive in question, is the parent
    company of Panasonic.

    Also, parts availability is still a concern, as you've noted.
    Which means ordering a replacement drive from the manufacturer of the laptop.

    This sometimes means lotsa $$$.

    Another alternative is to purchase an external CD-RW drive that can work with
    the USB or PCMCIA interfaces. - Reinhart
     
  7. What confounds me the most is that I can play recordings bought in the
    Maybe the drive is okay. Perhaps you should look at the CD-R discs themselves.

    Marginal CD-R discs can exhibit problems when being read at any speed faster
    than 1x, which can explain why your computer drives and portable CD players
    with ESP set on have problems reading the discs.

    ESP is a function on a CD player that protects against shocks by "reading
    ahead" the CD, storing the read in a RAM buffer, then playing off the buffer.
    This read ahead requires the drive read speed to be increased to faster than
    real-time rate, and so you have the same problem with the portable CD players
    with ESP on that you do with the computer drives.

    Windows Media Player has an option to digitally extract the audio and then play
    the rip through the sound card as a WAV. If this is engaged, your computer
    drive will attempt to read ahead and buffer the read into RAM so the digital
    extraction can be analysed and the sound levels detected so the WMP can drive
    the graphics generator that is designed to react to the sound.

    Many CD-R discs are made by Taiwanese manufacturers, typically Ritek and CMC
    Magnetics. Many name brands have used these manufacturers to make their
    products. TDK, Philips, Imation, Verbatim, Maxell, Memorex, Dysan, Nashua, and
    many others have had their discs manufactured by either Ritek, CMC Magnetics,
    or both.

    Ritek and CMC CD-R products are among some of the worst CD-R discs I have seen.
    They don't write reliably at higher speeds and they don't seem able to hold up
    for more than a year or two before starting to have problems.

    I recommend you consider Taiyo Yuden discs. Do an internet search for any
    distributors in your area that sells Taiyo Yuden media. Taiyo Yuden discs are
    made in Japan and are generally superb discs with excellent tolerances of
    extreme conditions and superior recording reliability. - Reinhart
     
  8. CNDA

    CNDA Guest

    Thanks very much to all of you, for your interesting and useful answers.

    César
     
  9. I seriously think that your problem may be due to bad CD-R discs. Your drive
    may be okay. - Reinhart
     
  10. Sunny

    Sunny Guest

    If the problem consistently appears mid-disk, it's possible the laser
    transport is binding part way through it's travel due to dried out
    and/or contaminated lubricant.

    I have revived a couple of drives with similar symptoms by cleaning the
    drive rail with isopropyl alcohol and re-lubing with white lithium grease.

    Sunny
     
  11. CNDA

    CNDA Guest

    l
    That's what I thought and I attempted to clean the laser transport track
    as best I could. I cleaned both my portable (Walkman type) and my
    UJDA710 detachable CD-ROM/DVD player with isopropyl alcohol soaked
    Q-Tips, but, it hasn't solved my problem.
    grease.

    White lithium grease? Never heard of that.

    Thank you,

    César
     
  12. Van Gardner

    Van Gardner Guest

    You have to be careful recommending "rubbing alcohol". Rubbing
    alcohol sometimes contains glycerin to counter the drying effect on
    the skin of the alcohol. I sometimes see rubbing alcohol in the
    grocery store on sale two pints for a dollar. Some of it is clear,
    blue or green. Reading the label it is usually 70% isopropyl alcohol.
    Who knows what the other 30% is. IBM used to sell a small bottle p/n
    2200200 that was 91% for cleaning disks and heads. I still have about
    3 oz. left in my bottle and have been wondering where I will get more
    when that is used up. Maybe I will have to revert back to an
    experiment we hid in High School chemistry where the Teacher mixed
    some water and alcohol and we had to separate it by distillation.
    Water boils at 100c and alcohol at 70c. ;)

    Van Gardner
     
  13. Ethanol is 99% and is sold under the brand name Everclear.

    You can buy 91% isopropyl in any drug store, and many grocery stores.


    Mark Z.
     
  14. Bob Shuman

    Bob Shuman Guest

    I was able to special order 99% Isopropyl alcohol at the local Walgreen's.
    The pharmacist looked it up in a special order book and I had it within two
    days. The price was about 2-3 times that for the 91% version, but was
    substantially less than the potable Everclear!

    Bob
     
  15. gothika

    gothika Guest

    Is the lens on your laser glass or plastic?
    If glass then denatured alchohol is safe.
    If plastic use distilled water on a foam or pure cotton swab followed
    by a dry swab to pick up the moisture and a gentle shot of compressed
    air.
    There are some cleaners on the market that are safe plastic optics.
     
  16. Has anyone ever actually found problems using alcohol on plastic lenses???

    --- sam | Sci.Electronics.Repair FAQ Home Page: http://www.repairfaq.org/
    Repair | Main Table of Contents: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/
    +Lasers | Sam's Laser FAQ: http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/lasersam.htm
    | Mirror Site Info: http://www.repairfaq.org/REPAIR/F_mirror.html

    Important: Anything sent to the email address in the message header is ignored.
    To contact me, please use the feedback form on the S.E.R FAQ Web sites.
     
  17. Asimov

    Asimov Guest

    "Sam Goldwasser" bravely wrote to "All" (30 Jul 04 19:43:00)
    --- on the heady topic of "Re: Question regarding DVD/CD-ROM drive"

    SG> From: Sam Goldwasser <>

    SG> Has anyone ever actually found problems using alcohol on plastic
    SG> lenses???

    Well, there are many types of alcohols. If you try methyl it will
    certainly dissolve a lot of stuff and maybe even skin. One has to be
    clear which alcohol we are talking about. Isopropyl will dissolve pine
    resin and parafin but not plastics.

    A*s*i*m*o*v

    .... Just a little force field zap.
     
  18. Sunny

    Sunny Guest

    My local pharmacist has a 5-gallon jug of 99% isopropyl alcohol and was
    happy to sell me a 300mL bottle for $1.25 after I told him it was for
    cleaning electronics. I expect 300mL will last a lifetime!
     
  19. Assuming it doesn't all evaporate!

    --

    rgds
    LAurence

    ....Seven and a half million years and all you can come up with is 42?
     
  20. jakdedert

    jakdedert Guest

    In fact, don't even leave it open for a period of time longer than necessary
    to use it. It absorbs water from the air and becomes less effective in the
    process.

    jak
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-