Connect with us

Question on Wide Screen Rear Projection

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Confused in Illinois, Jul 25, 2003.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Replacing a 17 year old rear projection with a wide screen rear projection.

    Is most of broadcast tv and basic analog cable now broadcasting in the newer
    format?

    If watching older shows/movies that were formatted 4/3 how will the display
    show on the TV? Will there be black out bands on the sides or top/bottom?

    For what its worth: upgrading from Mitsu 45" rear projection to Mitsu Gold
    Series 55" wide screen.

    Thanks!!
     
  2. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    If the program content is not in 16:9, the picture will be cut on the
    sides. If you force the wide mode, the picture will be stretched.

    Most stations are not set up or broadcasting in the wide screen mode,
    and will not be for some time. This mode is only broadcasted by
    specific specialty channels. You would require digital cable service or
    have a satellite dish, and subscribe to these services. In Europe and
    Japan, the wide screen mode is more common than in North America. If
    you are going to watch a lot of DVD's and your player has this option, I
    would go for the wide screen format set.

    If you are going to mainly watch the standard TV stations, this would be
    a waste of extra money to purchase a wide screen set. As for thinking
    about the future, in about 5 years your set will be old, and there will
    be additions and changes in the industry. I think it is best to buy a
    TV for the present, since they do wear out after a number of years.

    The wide screen mode will not be common in NA for a while yet. The cost
    of conversion is very expensive especially for the broadcaster, and for
    the consumer. There are not enough sets out in the market place to
    warrant the conversion and expenses for the broadcasters. Only specific
    broadcasters are venturing in to this for experimentation, additional
    promotion, and they can write off the losses.

    Your cable company, and local broadcasters would be able to tell you
    information about the standards in your area, and what is available to
    you.

    As for the make of TV set, I personally only like sets that are made by
    the same manufactures who make broadcast equipment. Sony, Panasonic,
    and Hitachi are some of the major manufactures of broadcast equipment in
    the world, that are sold in North America, and Europe. Sony is
    considered the top in the broadcast field along with Ikigami, Leitch,
    Ross, CDL, Avid, Abekas, and a few others.

    From what I am hearing, Mitsubishi has been getting out of consumer TV
    equipment and consumer audio, and slowing down to give support in these
    lines. I would not depend on them for future support in their home
    entertainment products. Mitsubishi is staying only in their high end
    industrial and computer lines.

    Personally, I do not like rear screen sets. I find their pictures to
    be much softer than the CRT, LCD, or Plasma displays. I found them to
    not be as stable over a long period of time. Also, we are seeing a much
    higher failure rate in the rear screen sets, than the other technologies
    available.


    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    ==============================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    Instruments http://www.zoom-one.com/glgtech.htm
    ==============================================
    Replacing a 17 year old rear projection with a wide screen rear
    projection.

    Is most of broadcast tv and basic analog cable now broadcasting in the
    newer
    format?

    If watching older shows/movies that were formatted 4/3 how will the
    display
    show on the TV? Will there be black out bands on the sides or
    top/bottom?

    For what its worth: upgrading from Mitsu 45" rear projection to Mitsu
    Gold
    Series 55" wide screen.

    Thanks!!
     
  3. Dave D

    Dave D Guest

    Some RPTVs (and direct view) widescreen sets have a 'cinema' (or similar)
    mode where the 4:3 picture is cropped top and bottom to fill the screen,
    avoiding picture stretching. This has the added bonus that the station logos
    are often cut out, avoiding the dreaded burn in! The downside is that
    sometimes tops of heads are lost, and subtitles at the bottom, though my
    Toshiba has a 'subtitle' mode which crops the picture more at the top than
    the bottom for viewing subtitled programs.

    There's also (on my Toshiba) a 'super live' mode where 4:3 images are
    stretched far more at the left and right of the picture than the middle,
    which means the most important part of the screen doesn't look silly. This
    actually works rather well considering.

    Here in the UK most sets on sale now are widescreen, with a great deal of
    transmitted content being 16:9 format. I would never recommend buying a 4:3
    set to a UK resident, but obviously things are quite different in N.
    America. As you say a lot depends on what it will be used for, a DVD fanatic
    will likely want a widescreen, whereas a TV buff may prefer 4:3.

    Dave
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-