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Question about resistors.

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by mythos-, Apr 26, 2005.

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  1. mythos-

    mythos- Guest

    Hi, I have a continuity test on my multimeter, and when i tested a
    couple resistors, my meter beeped. Now the one resistor, as it beeped
    showed the proper resistance, does this mean the resistor is shorted?
     
  2. Guest

    I'm not sure about your multimeter, but a continuity test usually means
    that the resistance is less then several MegaOhms. So any low/med value
    resistor should pass the test.
     
  3. mythos-

    mythos- Guest

    ahh that explains it
     
  4. Tom Biasi

    Tom Biasi Guest

    You already got your answer but think about what you said. The resister
    showed the proper resistance, how could it be shorted?
     
  5. The continuity test just shows that the resistance between the leads
    is less than some (probably fairly low) value, and does not indicate
    that there is a short circuit (zero ohms) between the leads.

    --
    Peter Bennett, VE7CEI
    peterbb4 (at) interchange.ubc.ca
    new newsgroup users info : http://vancouver-webpages.com/nnq
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  6. The beeper function on your meter probably beeps whenever anything lower
    than 30 ohms or so is across the test leads. This level may vary from one
    make of meter to another, but it's a starting point.

    BTW -- I learned this the hard way: Don't depend on the beeper!!! If you're
    trying to find out of something is shorted, or trying to "ring out" a cable
    harness (that is to say, locate a particular wire among a bunch of others),
    or checking a fuse, it's tempting to listen to the beeper only and not look
    at the meter's display. Don't do this!!!! I once had a weak fuse give me
    trouble this way... instead of opening, it was dying of old age and had
    increased its resistance just enough to "eat up" all the current going
    through it and cause trouble downstream. But because I was checking the
    fuse "by ear," I didn't realize this. Since the meter was still beeping, I
    assumed that the fuse was good. But it wasn't! From that point on, I
    always look at the numeric display and see what it says instead.
     
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