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Question about Casio fx-115MS

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by Jack Crane, Nov 25, 2004.

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  1. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    What does the Rnd key (SHIFT 0) (in the lower-left corner) on the Casio fx-
    115MS calculator do, and how is it used?

    And is there anywhere on the web a better manual than the one that comes
    with the product? Or a tutorial?

    Thanks,

    Jack
     
  2. It produces a "random" number.

    Jon
     
  3. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    It rounds off the internal value contained in the Y-register so it
    equals the displayed value.
     
  4. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    Could you give me an example that includes the keys to push?

    Thanks,

    Jack
     
  5. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    From what range? The Rnd# key gives a random number in (0,1).

    Jack
     
  6. Woops! I got the key next to it! You said, Rnd! My mistake!

    Jon
     
  7. Yup! I was looking down at the calculator and looked for shift-0 and instead
    saw shift-. My mistake. Actually, I don't recall ever using Rnd, which is
    probably why I so quickly assumed I picked out the right key. Sorry about that.

    Jon
     
  8. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    Apology accepted.

    Jack
     
  9. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    I guessso, but its rather late now where I am. I'll do it ifircall
    tomorrow.
     
  10. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    Great!

    Jack
     
  11. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    Well here I amagain. Your calculator has three main registers for
    holding current values, X, Y, and K registers. they each have three
    particular jobs to do. X is the working reg., holding the displayed
    value, Y's like a variable reserve reg. for any ohter 'reserve' value
    and K holds fixed, programmable values. If you divide 50 by 10 then
    press <shift><x-y> you'll get the result 0.2 ratger tgan 5. Fool
    around with these registers and the RND function and yo';ll see what
    goes down. BTW, if you don't know what it does, why do you need to use
    it?
    Have fun.
     
  12. Try this sequence:

    PI = sin ans

    you get zero.

    Now, try

    PI rnd = sin ans

    you get 3.59n (or 3.59e-9)

    The rnd rounded PI to the digits on the display, so the answer wasn't
    exact wrt the internal registers.

    I can't think of a good use for this key. You almost never care about
    more than a few significant digits anyway.

    --
    Regards,
    Robert Monsen

    "Your Highness, I have no need of this hypothesis."
    - Pierre Laplace (1749-1827), to Napoleon,
    on why his works on celestial mechanics make no mention of God.
     
  13. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    So why don't you just tell me what RND does?

    BTW, if you don't know what it does, why do you need to use
    Is that a joke? If not, what do you mean? If I knew what it does, I might
    or might not find it useful. If it is useful to me, then I need it.

    Jack
     
  14. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    OK, in RAD MODE I pushed SHIFT-PI, =, sin, ANS, and got 0. That's fine.
    I pushed SHIFT-PI, SHIFT-Rnd, =, sin, ANS, and got 0 again, not your
    3.59n. Do you have the fx-115MS?
    Thanks for trying to help.

    Jack
     
  15. Sorry, I got the directions wrong, you need to put the value PI into the
    internal registers before you hit shift rnd. So, try this:

    shift PI = (puts it into the register)
    shift rnd (rounds register to whats on the display,
    subtracting some delta)
    sin ans = (computes sin(PI - delta))

    --
    Regards,
    Robert Monsen

    "Your Highness, I have no need of this hypothesis."
    - Pierre Laplace (1749-1827), to Napoleon,
    on why his works on celestial mechanics make no mention of God.
     
  16. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    Ok, got it. Thanks.

    BTW how did you learn this? I've found online PDFs of both sheets that came
    with my calculator, and that constitute its manual. They are at
    <ftp.casio.co.jp/pub/world_manual/ edu/en/fx100MS_115MS_E.pdf>

    And

    <http://ftp.casio.co.jp/pub/world_manual/edu/en/fx115MS_991MS_E.pdf>

    And Rnd is mentioned in neither of them.

    I'm now trying to figure out CALC. Could you take a look at the PDF of the
    second link I've quoted (or at your calculator's manual)? The CALC Memory
    section is on page 6 of the PDF. The example there doesn't work correctly
    for me. When I finish entering the function the screen shows "x-cubed + 3x
    - 12", which looks good. Then I push CALC and answer "7" for the "x?"
    prompt. I get 352 (instead of the correct 58). And for x=8 I get 524 (not
    76). Any ideas?

    Thanks,

    Jack
     
  17. Steve Evans

    Steve Evans Guest

    Really? Mine is obtained by pressing <shift><X^2> But I use the
    fx-3400P which may differ in some respects. I assumed mine was just
    hte programmable version of yours, but the differences might go wider,
    I dunno.
    Robert and me have already told you that.
    Fair enough.
     
  18. Chaos Master

    Chaos Master Guest

    Jack Crane is, and always will be:
    I think it stands for 'round number'.

    I have not had a Casio calculator for a long time, but AIUI and IIRC it
    works like:

    3.5683927835
    3

    RND

    3.568

    (rounding 3.5683927835 to 3 decimal)

    --
    Chaos Master®, posting from somewhere near Porto Alegre, Brazil.
    "... one either has a shit, or not. Do you have yours?"
    ¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
    http://marreka.blogspot.com --> news, hotter than high-power transistors!

    To reply remove "DEADTOTHESPAMMER" from address.

    NP in foobar2000: 15. Evanescence - [Fallen #05] Haunted [3:07]
     
  19. The answer is, actually 352:

    7^3 = 343
    3x7 = 21

    so

    343 + 21 - 12 = 352

    Sounds like you are doing it right...

    Now, try to figure out 'solve'.

    --
    Regards,
    Robert Monsen

    "Your Highness, I have no need of this hypothesis."
    - Pierre Laplace (1749-1827), to Napoleon,
    on why his works on celestial mechanics make no mention of God.
     
  20. Jack Crane

    Jack Crane Guest

    Oops. Thanks for checking this. In dim light with dimming eyes, from the
    manual I had read X-cubed instead of X-squared.
    OK! I'll try later today.

    Jack
     
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