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Putting An End to Dust Inside Computers

Discussion in 'Electronic Design' started by D from BC, Mar 9, 2007.

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  1. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Why is there this dust problem inside computers?
    All this high technology, yet crap is allowed to collect on the CPU
    cooler.
    This shouldn't be happening.
    Why hasn't this been fixed?

    Vacuums, canned gas, paint brushes and static electricity risks...
    What??? My computer needs a janitor??
    What a hassle... :(

    A while back I made my "It's a computer and a air cleaner" post
    http://groups.google.ca/group/sci.e...d+a+air+cleaner&rnum=1&hl=en#52698061709d66d0
    Maybe I can bolt this
    http://www.totalcomfortfl.com/AIRCLEAN.HTM
    to my computer. Arrff Arrfff :)

    I was surprised to find a computer filter material page.
    http://www.computerairfilter.com/Filter_materials.htm

    Well... here's what I really want to do...
    I never... ever want to clean dust out of my computer again...!!!

    If I have to stick a big honking filter on the computer, I will... I
    have plenty of space.
    Maybe I can use big automotive filters. That might take a very long
    time to clog..such as
    http://www.canadiandriver.com/articles/pw/k-n.htm

    Maybe I could stick a wad of polyester wool or fiberglass in a dryer
    hose.

    Any other ideas to end the cleaning?

    I'm surprised I haven't seen some product
    on the shelf in every computer store..
    D from BC
     
  2. Joerg

    Joerg Guest


    If it's any comfort this is the same with wood stoves. Instead of
    providing a wee space for a filter in front of the fans there is nada,
    zilch. Meaning that any dust that gets out when re-loading will be
    nicely distributed throughout the house.

    Have to re-load the stove in a half hour. Global Warming? Hah!
     

  3. You could always buy a case/PSU with the fans blowing the RIGHT way -
    i.e. INTO the case.

    IBM PCs were originally designed wrong and everyone copied. If you
    blew the air the correct way you only need to filter the input of the
    fans and ZERO dust would get into the case.
     
  4. Al

    Al Guest

    It has been fixed. There are computers that do no depend upon cooling
    air but on heat pipes for cooling of the cpu. But, the PS still needs a
    fan. Now if use heat pipe cooling for the PS, we could do away with air
    movement alltogether, seal the thing and do away with the dust.

    If you build your own computer using a box called a Shuttle, you can
    cool your CPU with heat pipes. I have built one and it works just fine.

    Check this out: http://eu.shuttle.com/archive/en/faq_ice.htm

    Al
     
  5. Most computers are cooled by sucking air into the case. That way, air
    enters through the multitude of large and small openings and cools all
    components a little.

    Since you always have a slight vacuum inside the case, dust will be
    sucked in through every little opening. That includes the floppy
    drive, CD-ROM drive, the gaps around all the connectors, the gaps
    where the case does not seal perfectly and so on.

    If you want to keep you case clean inside, I can really see only three
    options:

    1: Convert your cooling system to a pressurized case and filter the
    intake fan. Not as easy as it sounds.

    2: Place the computer inside a sealed box and ventilate the box
    sufficiently and filter the air intake.

    3: Convert to water cooling with a fanless radiator, such as Zalman's
    "Reserator" system or similar. This option gives you the added bonus
    of reducing the noise level dramatically.
     
  6. AZ Nomad

    AZ Nomad Guest

     
  7. AZ Nomad

    AZ Nomad Guest

    It is almost trivially easy.
    Remove the motheboard, cards, and drives from the old system and put them
    into a new case that is properly designed.
     
  8. SioL

    SioL Guest

    Not true, Athlon 2x here, 4400+ model, cooled with Zalman water tower,
    completely silent. Even the PSU is fanless.

    There is one large 12V 120mm fan, connected to 5V, slowly moving the
    air around just in case.

    All you can hear are hard disks.

    SioL
     
  9. Rich Grise

    Rich Grise Guest

    Ach! Way, way too much overkill. Put the computer in an air plenum made
    from a scavenged cardboard box and duct tape, and put a desk fan just
    inside with an ordinary $1.19 furnace filter at the inlet, maybe sprayed
    with Endust. Replace the filter when it starts to look dusty or once a
    year, whichever comes first. :)

    If you're feeling frisky, you could get some posterboard and make a duct
    around the desk fan. :)

    Have Fun!
    Rich
     
  10. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

     
  11. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    Interesting...
    I might do a fan and flow mod to my case if I think I can do it fast
    and cheap.
    Thanks
    D from BC
     
  12. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    I did some reading of the Zalman on
    http://techreport.com/reviews/2004q2/zalman-reserator/index.x?pg=1
    $201.00 US street price...
    D from BC
     
  13. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    I like option1... Maybe I can flip my PSU fan around.
    Also, my case has a spot for an extra fan. That can pressurize the
    case.
    Thanks
    D from BC
     
  14. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    PC cases are designed to suck in cool air from the front of the tower at
    the bottom,and draw it across the MB towards the top rear.
    (they figure you keep the front of your desktop cleaner than the back
    behind the PC...)
    Some cases have foam filters,but filters clog,and then the innards begin to
    overheat.

    Remember even a fiberglass filter will put more of a load on the exhaust
    fan(s),and thus less airflow.
     
  15. Jim Yanik

    Jim Yanik Guest

    According to an article I read recently,the fans are SUPPOSED to pull air
    OUT from inside the case,not push air in.
    See my other post about airflow across the motherboard.
     
  16. Day Brown

    Day Brown Guest

    For years, until my house burned down, I ran my PC off solar power in
    the Ozark boonies. Using DC-DC converters that were mounted on a board
    *outside* the case. No PS fan. Passive heat, lower power consumption.
    Course, you can do this when you have AC, use a battery charger to
    keep a battery up, with the DC-DC converters feeding the motherboad,,,
    which will keep right on working if the power goes out. It integrates
    the PS & UPS, and if you've ever hooked up car battery jumper cables
    the wrong way, and heard the snap, you have some idea of how hot a
    lightning strike would havta be to effect your system.

    So, if you are not pumping air thru the case all the time, dust is no
    problem. I usta have a tall wood case, like a chimney, with both the
    PC and PS in it, the natural convection was enough for passive
    heatsinks to keep the CPU kewl. The floppy and CD drive doors didnt
    have dust coming in either.
     
  17. Day Brown

    Day Brown Guest

    For years, until my house burned down, I ran my PC off solar power in
    the Ozark boonies. Using DC-DC converters that were mounted on a board
    *outside* the case. No PS fan. Passive heat, lower power consumption.
    Course, you can do this when you have AC, use a battery charger to
    keep a battery up, with the DC-DC converters feeding the motherboad,,,
    which will keep right on working if the power goes out. It integrates
    the PS & UPS, and if you've ever hooked up car battery jumper cables
    the wrong way, and heard the snap, you have some idea of how hot a
    lightning strike would havta be to effect your system.

    So, if you are not pumping air thru the case all the time, dust is no
    problem. I usta have a tall wood case, like a chimney, with both the
    PC and PS in it, the natural convection was enough for passive
    heatsinks to keep the CPU kewl. The floppy and CD drive doors didnt
    have dust coming in either.
     
  18. Robert Baer

    Robert Baer Guest

    What balderdash!
    A heatpipe, acting as a rather efficent thermal conductor, only
    allows one to transfer thermal energy (heat) from the generation
    point/area (say the CPU) to some other area; if there are no radiation
    fins and/or convective air flow (eg: fans), then those heatpipes are
    useless.
    Tell you what: want to be green and get cool(ing); use chlorophyll!
     
  19. D from BC

    D from BC Guest

    [snip]
    I was thinking of using a very large filter for the most air flow and
    least amount of filter changes/cleaning.
    Maybe a big shop vac filter? :) Arff Arfff..
    D from BC
     
  20. Palinurus

    Palinurus Guest

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