Connect with us

PSpice help needed

Discussion in 'Electronic Basics' started by [email protected], Aug 3, 2005.

Scroll to continue with content
  1. Guest

    I've started using PSpice as part homebrewing and design efforts. It
    is very interesting, and a great way to check out ideas before
    committing them to actual PC boards.

    Some questions:

    The version I downloaded has some limitations in the parts libraries.
    For example, I can't find many of the common parts used by ham
    homebrewers: MPf102 JFETS, NE602 mixers, etc. Where can I find the
    PSpice models of these parts? Has anyone developed a library of ham
    homebrew .MOD files for the parts we use?

    I've (sort of) figured out how to put an impedance matching transformer
    into the circuits. I select what they call a "non-linear" transformer
    (bad name I think) and this allows me to set the coupling coefficient
    and the turns on the primary and the secondary. But what about the
    core material, toroid vice no-toried, bifilar windings, etc. Is there
    a way of plugging in the kinds of toroids we use?

    Also, I'd be interested in hearing from other amateur homebrewers who
    are using Pspice in their solder-melting activities.

    Thanks and 73

    Bill N2CQR M0HBR CU2JL
    http://www.qsl.net/n2cqr
     
  2. There is a very active Spice group (though focused on LTspice, free
    from Linear Technology) in Yahoo Groups, but they have a few thousand
    subscribers, many well versed on all aspects of Spice. You might
    consider joining that group to get answers to your Spice questions.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LTspice/
     
  3. xpyttl

    xpyttl Guest

    Chuck Adams has a lot of spice models for typical homebrew components
    available on his web site, www.k7qo.net. He has a nice tutorial in the QRP
    Homebrewer, I think you can still get issue number 5. Also, the QRP-L
    archives CD has a lot of models (they may be mostly the same as Chuck
    though). The CD is available through QRP-ARCI.

    Most manufacturers provide models of their parts, so often googling the part
    number will land you on a spice model.

    ...
     
  4. Johnson

    Johnson Guest

    check out the banter at the sci.electronics.cad newsgroup --
    you can also google spice models

    oh, for transformers -- use a current dependent voltage source -- then you
    can add coupling capacitance, primary and secondary leakage inductance
    etc -- unfortunately it works down to D.C.
     
Ask a Question
Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?
You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Electronics Point Logo
Continue to site
Quote of the day

-