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Prolonging TV Life

Discussion in 'Electronic Repair' started by Brad, Oct 12, 2004.

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  1. Brad

    Brad Guest

    Hi,

    I have been servicing TVs for years. One thing I learned,
    when I see a picture, I can usally tell if the picture tube is getting "soft"
    (below normal emission). When I see this in TVs that are not very old,
    I will check the picture settings (via menu), and sure enough, almost every
    time, the "Contrast/Picture" and/or "Brightness" is turned up full or almost
    full (high). I always reduce the settings and tell the customer. Most
    times, this is the default setting from the factory, and you know what that
    means? Shorten the life of the TV requires replacement sooner.

    Brad

    Before you type your password, credit card number, etc.,
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  2. Sofie

    Sofie Guest

    Brad:
    The "conservative" settings that you recommend obviously needs to be
    BALANCED with the customer enjoying a bright, clear and detailed picture,
    after all this is what he paid for when he purchased a new television.
    Everything has a finite life and the old saying "a light that shines twice
    as bright will shine half as long" applies to most things in life.... I
    think I would rather have a brilliant shorter life than a very dull long
    one.
     
  3. I suppose that any setting that increases the cathode current on the picture
    tube will decrease its life.
     
  4. John

    John Guest

    I suppose there could be an argument for increasing the CRT heater current
    near the end of the tubes life to get a few extra months of quality viewing.
    John....
     
  5. You suppose right. Boosters often work well. About 15 years ago, I
    experimented with rejuvenation which used capacitor discharge + temporary
    filament voltage boost to "blast" the cathode and expose new emissive
    material. Got mixed results. At best, it worked for a only short while.
    Filament voltage boosters can work for years. However, I am going on past
    experience and don't really know how more recent CRTs behave with boosters.
     
  6. Jerry G.

    Jerry G. Guest

    The manufactures want their TV products to look very high in contrast
    when out on the floor. This is why the contrast is set to 100% when the
    set is out of the box. They calibrate the set, so that at maximum
    contrast, the drive is just at under 10% of the maximum clip point, to
    have just a little latitude.

    Most customers leave the settings this way. The very high contrast
    setting will wear the CRT out faster. Many of the viewers like a solid
    very high contrast picture, and leave it this way. The rating of the
    tube is done at the maximum contrast. Lowering the contrast to about 60%
    of its maximum output will most likely nearly double the life span of
    the CRT.

    --

    Jerry G.
    ======

    Hi,

    I have been servicing TVs for years. One thing I learned,
    when I see a picture, I can usally tell if the picture tube is getting
    "soft"
    (below normal emission). When I see this in TVs that are not very old,
    I will check the picture settings (via menu), and sure enough, almost
    every
    time, the "Contrast/Picture" and/or "Brightness" is turned up full or
    almost
    full (high). I always reduce the settings and tell the customer. Most
    times, this is the default setting from the factory, and you know what
    that
    means? Shorten the life of the TV requires replacement sooner.

    Brad

    Before you type your password, credit card number, etc.,
    be sure there is no active key logger (spyware) in your PC.
     
  7. RonKZ650

    RonKZ650 Guest

    And as a side question to tube life, what's the oldest original tube out there
    still working. My family still is using an old Quasar TS915 works in a drawer
    from 1968. Tube still good as the day it was built. Also the old 19" zeniths
    from 1973 to 1976. Anybody *ever* seen one of them even marginally weak? Age
    and use isn't everything.
     
  8. Hey, I have a B/W Philco around 1951 with a good CRT. The base fell off and
    the vertical died but the CRT is otherwise fine. Anyone wants it, make
    an offer or I might get to repair it in a future life. :)

    There's also the Pilot TV-37 with a scope CRT. Needs all its paper caps
    replaced, etc., but I think the CRT works.

    Oops, maybe you meant real TVs. ;-)

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  9. John Del

    John Del Guest

    Subject: Re: Prolonging TV Life
    Also the old 19" zeniths

    Yeah, the old Chromacolor IIs last forever. Most of them were thrown away
    still running strong. I had a 17" model in high school. I sold it many years
    later still running like new.

    The oldest TV I have is a Philco Predicta from 1961. Tube still excellent.

    John Del
    Wolcott, CT

    "I'm just trying to get into heaven, I'm not running for Jesus!"
    Homer Simpson

    (remove S for email reply)
     
  10. Andy Cuffe

    Andy Cuffe Guest


    It's true that it makes no sense to run a TV too dimly to enjoy it,
    but the factory default of most TVs is ridiculous. They have the
    contrast and color set so high that the picture is often blooming and
    out of focus.
    Andy Cuffe
     
  11. MarkC

    MarkC Guest

    Usually the CRTs will outlast PCB component failure. I very rarely see a
    TV with a bad CRT (unless it's a '94 & up Zenith) I usually run my
    personal TVs at about 90% contrast & keep the brightness at around
    65-75%.
    Mark
     
  12. I'd rather have a better focused picture that lasts longer than a blazing
    bright one that is soft and has a shorter life. Virtually all sets come out
    of the box with the contrast levels defaulting to higher than necessary for
    the best pix.

    Leonard
     
  13. "Tube still good as the day it was built."???? Come on, with a statement
    like that no one will give you much credibility on anything.

    Leonard
     

  14. Hi fellow techs !!

    Thanks to all for their useful comments.
    I just want to add a few words.

    I clean the inside of my 5 TV's once a year to make sure everything
    is running cool.I also check all caps for high ESR.(Thanks to Bob Parker).

    Whenever I encounter an IC/Transistor that is too hot to touch I simply
    bolt a larger heat sink to the original one.Makes wonders!! I even added a
    small and quiet fan to cool down a reluctant vertical output.
    I believe that this will prolong the life of my TV's and prevent future
    failures due to excess heat.


    Jacques
     
  15. RonKZ650

    RonKZ650 Guest

    "Tube still good as the day it was built."???? Come on, with a statement
    Another real intelligent remark from you Leonard. I suppose you've got better
    eyes that me. Let's just say for "normal" humans, the tube looks as good as the
    day it was built, a catagory which you don't fall into.
    Ron
     
  16. I tested a 20+ year-old CRTa few years back just for fun; the set was
    toast. I don't know how it looked, but the CRT tested better than many
    newer ones only 3-5 years old. I don't know how the phosphor was,
    though.

    Tom
     
  17. Paul Taylor

    Paul Taylor Guest

    I clean the inside of my 5 TV's once a year to make sure everything
    My previous 29" 4:3 JVC TV had a power device fail after 3 or 4 years.
    No heatsink compound!!!
    When the bloke arrived with a pack of replacement components to fit, I asked
    if he was going to use heatsink compound? I had some to use otherwise!
    Too messy to bother with at the factory? (or the sets would be far too
    reliable if they did use it? :)

    Got a rear-projection Tosh 42PW23P about two years ago. No problems so far.

    Paul
     
  18. I'm assuming there was no rubber strip either? That stuff is used
    sometimes.

    Tom
     
  19. It is simply silly, Ron, to say that any decades old tube works the way it
    did when new. No offense intended, but if you want to be deemed credible...

    Leonard
     
  20. Jason D.

    Jason D. Guest

    Um, Open RCA TVs, no heatsink grease on many unless part was
    replaced. Thermal pads, RCA did use them on many transistors that has
    live (cold or hot) tab not insulated tab. Early RCA sets (13" mainly
    had thermal pad on HOT that has exposed collector tab on back of that
    transistor.

    Cheers,

    Wizard
     
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