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Projector lighting not working right.

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by Jack Padilla, May 27, 2014.

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  1. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    I received this projector as a gift: A MerchSource 1614974 (Known as the 'Wonderwall' Projector).

    [​IMG]
    (Even though it's not professional, at least this novelty works for it's purpose)

    It was a bit used, but worked as normal for the first 2 days.

    Until the projector turned off on it's own (Possibly the socket where I plugged the projector in was shortened, as the socket does not work anymore) and now, every time I turn it back on (Even on any socket), the brightness is messed up no matter if it is near or far from the wall!

    Possibly the issue is caused by either the bulb or the knick-knacks inside it.

    Here are a few photos (Taken recently and sorry for large photos):

    [​IMG]
    Here's the projector right now. I hooked it to my DVD player as an example of an output.

    [​IMG]
    Here is the projection at the recommended brightness. It looks bright even though it shouldn't.

    [​IMG]
    Here is the projection at the LOWEST brightness. Still bright but it only projects the colors.

    [​IMG]
    Here is the projection at the HIGHEST brightness. Way too bright (So bright I can't read the text normally).

    Anybody help me out on how to fix this thing or give me some recommendations?
     
  2. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    Anyone?
     
  3. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

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    Jan 15, 2010
    It looks to me like your projector lens is not focused. Can you turn the lens to adjust its length, or is there possibly an internal lens that can be moved in and out to focus.
    I realize you think the brightness has increased, but that may be because the lens distance from the bulb (and shrouding around the lens), may be at the wrong distance.
    I'd try to adjust the lens distance from the bulb, befoe messing with other things.
     
  4. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    I always adjust the focus every time I place it somewhere, and no matter how far off the wall the projector is it will have the same issue.
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,412
    2,780
    Jan 21, 2010
    Does the image change at all when you change the focus?

    At the very least, can you get a sharp rectangular edge to the projected image?

    It is possible that the focussing is broken.
     
  6. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    Focus is normal and it doesn't distort/change the image. The issue is the brightness of the projection (Either by the bulb or something).
     
  7. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,767
    487
    Jan 15, 2010
    Alright, if it worked correctly for two days, then something blew inside the projector that blew the wall socket supplying the power to the projector:
    I would then assume something electrical inside the projector (Your 'Knick Knacks) was damaged, and that's causing an increase in the voltage to the projector bulb, that is
    'blooming', or intensifying the brightness of the bulb (which will shorten the bulb life). Have you got any electronic troubleshooting skills and a volt meter?
    The bulb will have a number on it, you can Google the projector bulb number to find-out what voltage it operates at.
    I'd remove the bulb, and use a volt meter (On AC or DC, depending on the bulb designation), and measure the voltage at the bulb socket.
    If you have a higher voltage at the bulb socket than what the bulb is rated for; you'd need to troubleshoot the power supply circuit to the bulb socket, and find out why the voltage is higher than normal.
    I don't know if you have the knowledge to do that, but maybe you know somebody who does.
     
  8. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    As I searched the projector on Google, I found out that many people recommend getting a bulb with a higher voltage rate. I do have skills in troubleshooting thanks to experience, but I don't have a volt meter with me (My father has one, but he lives somewhere else). I will try to borrow one from someone I know. Until I can acquire a volt meter and try to search for a stronger bulb that can handle the voltage from the readings, I will do a bit of more research and test some A/V equipment I am planning to use for it. I will report back with any results.

    (Pardon the mass editing. I really hate doing this on a mobile device with these cursed touch keyboards.)
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  9. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,767
    487
    Jan 15, 2010
    It makes sense to use a bulb capable of operating at a higher voltage than what the bulb socket is designed for when you're trying to extend the life of he bulb. A bulb filament operating at a slightly lower
    operating voltage is less stress on the filament, which would extend it's life. My concern, is that some electronic part in the circuit that controls the voltage to the projector bulb socket may have been damaged.
    Possibly resulting in a higher than normal voltage to the bulb, which would account for the increased brightness of the bulb. If I were you, I would open up the projector (With it unplugged, no power), and carefully
    inspect the electronic components inside the projector. Something that would cause the wall power socket to blow (fuse or circuit breaker), should have been powerful enough to have burned a component inside
    your projector that you can see with a close visual inspection. I am THINKING, that you may have component damage that is not regulating the voltage to the projector bulb, supplying higher voltage to the
    bulb than normal. That alone might cause bulb failure, a fire from an overheated bulb, or additional damage to the projector. It's not difficult to just open the projector up, and look for a burned component.
    I'd do that no matter what else you decide you want to do here.
     
  10. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

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    May 27, 2014
    [​IMG]
    Here's the insides! Those circuit boards are packed in IKEA style for some reason...
    Bulb reads "EXN 12V50W", depicting the bulb runs on 12 volts (Assuming it's AC since the projector is powered in AC) in 50 watts. Also, I can't seem to tell if the bulb is polarized...

    [​IMG]
    I can't remember what those discs and red things are, but I believe this is what handles the current?

    [​IMG]
    And this is where the power is led to. Resistors and such...

    So far, I can't seem to find some fried components in it.

    [​IMG]
    Oh look, I think this was in beta all along! Better debug it in Visual Studio!
    Just Joking! But seriously, how the f*ck did this insect made it inside? I'm unsure, but I think this guy might be a suspect of the problem (Possibly chewed on some of the components). Anyways, I will dispose this disgusting corpse before I put it back up.
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2014
  11. shrtrnd

    shrtrnd

    3,767
    487
    Jan 15, 2010
    I don't SEE any physical component damage. The disc/red components look like 'capacitors', but some might be something else (the part numbers on them can be Googled to identify them). Do you have a voltmeter?
    With the bug removed, are you seeing 12V at the socket (the bulb is probably running at 12VDC). The flash washed-out any identifying markings on the 8-pin integrated circuit above the bug in the picture. It's possible
    the mere presence of the bug body shorted the integrated circuit pins. The IC might be alright, or may have been damaged if the bug shorted it. I assume you removed the bug and tried the projector again to see if the
    brightness problem solved itself. If not, does that integrated circuit chip that was above the bug have a part number on it?
     
  12. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

    8
    0
    May 27, 2014
    The IC reads "TDA2822M YCC 0715A".
    I still don't know why it's still "blooming" even though everything looks fine and nothing's burnt (Kinda odd).
     
  13. davenn

    davenn Moderator

    13,662
    1,889
    Sep 5, 2009
    That's the audio amplifier .... so it won't be affecting the picture


    Dave
     
  14. Jack Padilla

    Jack Padilla

    8
    0
    May 27, 2014
    Well, now I can tell it's not the IC's fault that caused the problem. But still, what's causing the brightness error? The bulb? Voltage irregularity? Component failure? This is getting a bit odd...

    I still have plans to acquire a voltmeter to check the output voltage/wattage (At least it's cheap to get one).
     
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