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Problem Melting Solder

Discussion in 'Troubleshooting and Repair' started by csmith, Jul 13, 2013.

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  1. csmith

    csmith

    4
    0
    Jul 13, 2013
    Hi All,

    I'm having difficulty repairing a PCB. I'm trying to solder in new power leads. I've attached a picture of where I char'd the board and melted the insulation, yet the solder sits there only barely melted.

    I'm using MG Chem .032" dia, 21 guage, no clean, lead free solder, which I purchased from mouser.com. I tried melting it with both the iron, and the hot air gun on a 852++ rework station with the heat turned all the way up. I know it's getting hot... the wire's insulation melted just fine.

    So I'm guessing it's the lead free solder. Is this stuff just not usable? Do I need flux? Do I just need to get leaded solder? I wouldn't think that they would make lead free solder if it didn't melt...?!?!?

    What is your advice?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,496
    2,837
    Jan 21, 2010
    1) tin the wires first

    2) use a hotter iron (or one with higher thermal capacity)

    3) use flux (or solder with a flux core)
     
  3. Y2KEDDIE

    Y2KEDDIE

    259
    15
    Sep 23, 2012
    Lead Free solder

    I'm partial to Kester 63/37, and 60/40. I clean desoldered holes and leads with acetone.On stubborn cases I use a little paste flux.

    I've tried lead free solder; I don't like it. It acts different (obviously). Maybe it just takes getting use to.

    It's probably not a good idea to mix solders.

    What do you other guys think?

    I know I'm old school, I still use a Simpson 260 meter too.
     
  4. eKretz

    eKretz

    251
    27
    Apr 8, 2013
    I'm with you. Whenever I work on a lead-free board I always switch the solder to 63/37 or 60/40 when repairing or replacing components. I usually remove the lead-free with a sucker or wick and slather on a little leaded and remove it again to make sure most of the lead-free is gone.
     
  5. (*steve*)

    (*steve*) ¡sǝpodᴉʇuɐ ǝɥʇ ɹɐǝɥd Moderator

    25,496
    2,837
    Jan 21, 2010
    I have some lead free solder, but I rarely use it.

    It's not so much that it's difficult as that it just seems to look wrong.
     
  6. Woodman

    Woodman

    47
    0
    Dec 3, 2012
    That lead free crap is for plumbers! For repairs/mods low temp is almost always better and 60/40 is the best. Tin and clean your iron too. It is amazing how little solder you need with these proper techniques.




    Woody
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2013
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