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powering 36 DSLR cameras from a single powersupply

Discussion in 'Power Electronics' started by Adrian S, Jan 4, 2019.

  1. Adrian S

    Adrian S

    4
    0
    Jan 4, 2019
    Hi there.

    I am a total novice when it comes to understanding power supplies and the like. Last year I built myself a multi-camera rig in order to produce realistic human 3D models for animation. I am looking this year to improve on my build. One such area for improvement would be its power supply. Currently each camera has a dummy battery connected to a mains transformer ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/PremiumDigital-Canon-Replacement-Power-Adapter/dp/B00841UIOU )... very messy cables and lots of multi plugs. I would like to remove all the individual power supplies and replace them with a single transformer or even a couple to service all the cameras. At the moment the rig uses 18 canon eos 400d cameras but I plan to double this number so wish to accommodate scalability. Any formulas on how to calculate what I would need a transformer to deliver or any help/guidance would be much appreciated (I do dislike having to cable tie transformers together to try to make them tidy)
     
  2. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Easy. Multiply what one camera needs by 36. The current that is, the voltage stays the same.

    Bob
     
  3. Adrian S

    Adrian S

    4
    0
    Jan 4, 2019
    Thankyou Bob that does make it sound easy :) So.... how would i work out what each camera needs..... the only figures I can see are DC 8.1v on camera body, 7.4v 720mah on batteries and output 7.4v 2A on the power adapters. Is there a way I can test the current draw of the camera or should i use the batteries 720mAh (7.4v 26A) or the power supplies 2A (7.4v 72A) as a guideline ?
     
  4. BobK

    BobK

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    Jan 5, 2010
    Do you have a multimeter?

    It does not use 2A or the battery would last about 20 minutes at most.

    Bob
     
  5. Adrian S

    Adrian S

    4
    0
    Jan 4, 2019
    Yes I do have a multi meter (only used it to check for continuity). but have literally just finished watching a vid on testing current.. something for me to do over the weekend. Thankyou for your help , I am definitely moving in the right direction now. The only thing that Is confusing me now is the voltage side of things.. I can find lots of 12v supplies that offer varying amounts of wattage. For example I already use one of these https://www.wholesaleledlights.co.uk/led-strip-lights/led-power-supplies/150w-led-driver.html to power 7m of led strip lights.. are these the types of units I should be considering https://www.tme.eu/gb/details/hrp-300-7.5/built-in-power-supplies/mean-well/ (once i've worked out the draw).
     
  6. BobK

    BobK

    7,450
    1,582
    Jan 5, 2010
    Measuring the current might be tricky. The camera likely draws a burst of current when you take a shot. If all 36 are triggered at the same time, you have to allow for that max current. You might not be able to read it with the multimeter. A storage scope would be better, but I doubt you have one of those.

    Bob
     
  7. Adrian S

    Adrian S

    4
    0
    Jan 4, 2019
    you're absolutely right.. I don't have a storage scope.
     
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